Safety Helmet

  1. Product Spotlight: 3M SecureFit Safety Helmet

    Protecting your skull is an important part of job site safety. After all, without your head – it’s kind of hard to do anything. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the all-new 3M SecureFit X5000 Series ANSI Safety Helmet.

    The Features


     

    Let’s start with the basics of this helmet. Like most standard helmets it features suspension and adjustment options. But 3M has taken these basic features a step further to create a quality helmet that breaks the status quo.

    Suspension

    This helmet features 3M Pressure Diffusion technology in the suspension to increase both comfort and security. In fact, the Pressure Diffusion reduces the force on your forehead by up to 20% when compared to older styles of 3M helmet suspension. The suspension also has been designed to sit lower on the head to further reduce the pressure and increase both comfort and security.

    Adjustments

    What good is a helmet that has comfortable suspension if the helmet doesn’t fit on your head you ask? Well, with 15 different adjustment settings that allow for a range of different height and front-to-back settings, you won’t have to worry about that anymore. Plus, the smooth, turning ratchet suspension system makes the headband adjustments quick and easy.

    Additional Features

    This helmet doesn’t just stop at basic features like suspension and adjustment options. It also includes accessory slots and clips integrated into the helmet that are compatible with a wide variety of 3M accessories. And, it includes a UVicator sensor that is installed on the helmet. The UVicator sensor changes color from red to white over time as it is exposed to UV (ultraviolet) light. Once the color has changed to white it indicates that that the helmet should be retired due to UV exposure.

    Design


     

    You’ll notice as soon as you look at the helmet that it doesn’t look like a traditional safety helmet. That’s because the design is inspired by modern climbing helmets. Who said you can’t be safe while looking cool? And, the brimless design ensures that you have a better awareness of hazards.

    Standards


     

    Now we get to the most important part – standards. After all, you need to know if this helmet is something that you can use on a specific job site. All 3M SecureFit X5000 Series helmets meet ANSI Z89.1-2014 and are Type 1 helmets. We covered helmet standards in more detail in our Safety Helmets 101 blog post. We also have a free Safety Helmets 101 poster that you can download from our Knowledge Base.

    Options


     

    This helmet comes in a wide variety of options. First, you can choose if you want standard or reflective. Then you can choose whether you want a vented or non-vented helmet. The last thing you can choose is color. This helmet is available in a total of 8 colors.

    For more information about the 3M SecureFit X5000 Series ANSI Safety Helmet you can view the product here or click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    3M SecureFit Safety Helmet: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social


     

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  2. Product Spotlight: KASK Super Plasma HD Safety Helmet

    Head injuries are no joke. A head injury can cause brain damage, trauma, or even death. We know that protecting your noggin is an important part of job site safety. Not only is it important, but it’s required by law. OSHA states that a safety helmet must be worn “when working in areas where there is potential for injury to the head from falling objects”. While a safety helmet is required, not every helmet is the same. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the KASK Super Plasma HD Safety Helmet.

    Features


     

    This helmet is jam-packed with cool features. It features ten air intakes to help keep you cool. These air intakes have an anti-intrusion grille that prevents dirt and debris from getting into the helmet. It also features premium lamp clips that are made of strong nylon and are compatible with any headlamp that has an elastic band. Storing the helmet is easy, too. The ring to hook special loop on the chin strap allows the helmet to easily connect to your harness.

    It also has visor attachments so that you can connect your favorite KASK Visor to your helmet. KASK doesn’t stop there, though. They’ve also included an integrated slot for earmuffs with a bayonet attachment. It also includes KASK’s “Up & Down System” which ensures a precise and comfortable fit around the neck. The center wheel and two side flaps allow for quick adjustment in both width and height.

    Construction


     

    The bells and whistles of this helmet weren’t only reserved for the sweet features. The construction is impressive, too. The outer shell is constructed of ABS plastic while the inner shell is made of HD Polystyrene. The soft PA Nylon provides ultimate comfort during your daily use and the universal size means this helmet can be adjusted from 20 to 24 3/8 inches (that’s 51 to 62 cm for our metric friends).

    Style & Standards


     

    This helmet has a style that more closely resembles a bike helmet rather than a traditional hard hat. But that doesn’t make it any less safe. What really matters when looking at a safety helmet is that it meets the standards (Type & Class) that are required for the work you are doing. Type covers impact and class covers electrical ratings. For more detailed information about standards, best practices, and service life, check out our Safety Helmets 101 blog post and our free Safety Helmets 101 downloadable poster.

    Now that we’ve established that there are specific standards, and you’ve had a chance to check out what those standards entail (if you didn’t already know, of course). Let’s break down the standards for this helmet. It meets ANSI Z89.1-2014 and CSA Z94.1-2015 which means the standards for this helmet have been established. Those standards are Type 1, Class C.

    If you’ve got more questions on the KASK Super Plasma HD Safety Helmet or if you’re looking for more information about safety helmets in general, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see the KASK Super Plasma HD Safety Helmet

    Click here to see our full selection of KASK gear

    Click here to see all of our blog posts about safety helmets/hard hats

    Click here to download a free copy of our Safety Helmets 101 downloadable poster straight from our Knowledge Base

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any PPE is used.

    Safety Helmets: The Playlist


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGqmxdXiNrQ&list=PLZQI6zuBv9QM4a2K-mTIvp2MefUCl5WiQ

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

    iTunes | Spotify | Google Play Music

     

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

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    We’re Also on Snapchat


    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  3. Must-Haves: Tower Climber Edition

    As a tower climber there is a ton of different gear to choose from and sometimes weeding through everything can take way too much time. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the must-have gear you need to get the job done and stay safe.

    The Gear


     

    So, what are the essentials needed for tower climbers?

    Harness 

    Let’s start with the most obvious: a harness. Your harness is the focal point of all your gear, but which harness is the best? Well, that depends on some factors about what job you will be doing. Don’t worry – we’ve got you covered. You can click here to check out our Ultimate Fall Protection Harness Buying Guide for details on how to pick the right harness for you.

    Helmet

    The next intricate piece is a helmet. Protecting your dome is important and picking the right helmet ensures that your noggin will go uncracked. Picking the right helmet involves a little bit of knowledge about the job at hand. Check out our Safety Helmets 101 blog post where we take you through the what’s what when it comes to keeping your noodle safe. You can also download our free Safety Helmets 101 pdf from our Knowledge Base.

    Twin Leg Lanyard

    Once you’ve got your harness and helmet covered, it’s time to look at a shock absorbing lanyard. Twin leg lanyards are diverse. They come in a range of styles and lengths for a range of specific applications (like foot level tie off or tie-back) and with a ton of different connection point options.

    Cable Safety Sleeve (Cable Grab)

    Chances are, a tower you encounter will have a cable climb system which means you will need a way to securely connect your harness to that system. In fact, nearly every telecom tower in North America has a cable climb system of some sort. So, your gear list isn’t complete without a cable grab. While the basic function of cable grabs are pretty much the same – there are subtle differences in each.

    Pass-Through Sling (Pass-Through Web Anchor)

    Sometimes you will run into a situation where you need to make your own anchorage point. Having a pass-through anchor in your gear list will give you the ability to produce that anchorage point.

    Positioning Lanyard

    You’ve made it to your destination on the tower, but now you can’t quite work where you need to because the cable climb system isn’t in the right spot and you need both of your hands to work. That’s where a positioning lanyard comes in. Using your twin leg lanyard to move safely to your working location you can then position yourself and work handsfree with your positioning lanyard.

    Bolt Bag

    You’ve only got two hands (us too, unfortunately) which means that carrying nuts, bolts, and small tools up the tower while your climbing isn’t possible. That’s why a bolt bag is on our must-haves list.

    Carabiner

    At least one carabiner will make your life and the job so much easier. We recommend at least two typically, but one will get you by. Carabiners have a ton of different applications but using one to connect your bolt bag to your harness isn’t a bad idea. Find out more about carabiner gates with our free downloadable pdf from our knowledge base.

    Separator Bar (Spreader Bar)

    Sitting or leaning while positioned on the tower can place a lot of pressure on your waist and hips. It’s hard on your body and uncomfortable. Especially if you’re in that position for an extended amount of time. Using a separator spreader bar helps relieve that pressure and keep you feeling great.

    RF Monitor

    Not all dangers can be seen with the human eye and RF frequencies are one of them. Ensuring that you are not overexposed to RF waves is extremely important to your safety and the FieldSENSE 2.0 Personal RF Monitor has you covered. For more information on the FieldSENSE RF Monitor check out our blog post.

    Duffle Bag

    You’re loaded up with all the must-have gear for climbing the tower, but now you’ve got one little problem – you can’t carry it all. Did we mention having 2 hands isn’t enough already? A duffle bag fixes that problem. Fit all your gear neatly organized in one single, easy to transport duffle bag.

    All-In-One Solution


     

    We’ve covered a lot of information in this blog post – and sifting through all of the different options for each of the must-have pieces of gear takes time. Because we know that your time is precious our Gear Experts® have put together an Essential Tower Climbing Kit that includes all of the equipment we discussed in this blog post (except for the RF Monitor). It also includes a variety of upgradable options (like the RF Monitor).

    We have a variety of different kits assembled by our Gear Experts® for a range of different applications.

    Need help finding the perfect kit? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of tower climbing gear

    Click here to see our Essential Tower Climbing Kit

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Tower Climbing Kits: Video Edition



     

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  4. Safety Helmets 101

    This week our Gear Experts® are here to talk about hard hats. Whether you call them helmets or hard hats, protecting your skull is an important part of on the job safety.

    The Rules


     

    OSHA states that a safety helmet must be worn “when working in areas where there is potential for injury to the head from falling objects.” Hard hats must also be worn in areas where there’s a risk of exposure to electrical conductors that can potentially contact the head. In these situations, specially designed helmets must be used.

    Hard Hat Types


     

    Type I

    Type I hard hats are intended to reduce forces of impact from a blow to the top of the head. These are the most common helmet on the job site. Type 1 helmets would protect a worker from a dropped hammer or tape measure.

    Type II

    Type II hard hats are intended to reduce forces from lateral impact coming from an off-center, side, or top of the head strike. This impact could be from a sharp corner of an I-Beam or swinging structural element of a tower. The sides of these helmets are typically lined with a high-density foam or suspension.

    Electrical Classes


     

    Class E

    Class E hard hats are designed to reduce exposure to high voltage conductors and offer protection up to 20,000 volts. These helmets cannot be vented. Formerly associated with the “Class B” rating, Class E hard hats can also be considered a General, “Class G” hard hat.

    Class G

    Class G hard hats are designed to reduce exposure to low voltage conductors. They offer protection up to 2,200 volts. Like Class E helmets, this protection is only for the head. Class G was formerly categorized as “Class A”.

    Class C

    Class C hard hats are considered conductive, and they do not provide any electrical protection. These helmets are typically vented, and only protect workers from impacts but do provide workers increased breathability.

    Labeling


     

    To qualify as an ANSI certified helmet, there must be a legible label inside the helmet which identifies the standards that the hard hat was designed to meet. If your helmet is missing this label or it’s no longer legible, it should be replaced.

    Service Life


     

    A hard hats service life starts from the time it was put into service. While there is a date code stamped into the helmet, that is only the date of manufacturing. When a helmet is put into service, it should be documented on the label in the shell of the hard hat.

    The helmet suspension should be replaced after no more than every 12 months, and the helmet should be replaced after no more than 5 years. These dates are the maximum, and the helmet should be inspected regularly to ensure that it is still safe.

    If the hard hat has sustained an impact it must be removed from service. Even if there is no visible damage, the materials could have weakened and may no longer provide the level of protection required.

    Best Practices


     

    Suspensions should always be designed by the manufacturer to work with the specific hard hat and should not be modified. Only use the specific suspension when replacing a worn-out suspension and install it to the manufacturer’s instructions. This includes installing it backward, so the brim of a helmet can be worn in the back. Although, some manufacturers do offer swing-style suspensions which allow the helmet to be reversed.

    Do not paint your helmet. Chemicals in the paint can alter and damage the structure of the hard hat and reduce the protection provided. If you’re painting on the jobsite, always clean your helmet according to the manufacturer’s recommendations to remove any chemicals or paint residue that may be present.

    Pressure sensitive, non-metallic stickers or self-adhesive tape are typically acceptable on most of today’s hard hats. However, you must refer to the manufacturer’s recommendation to verify if they’re allowed on your particular hard hat and for placement guidelines.

    Standards


     

    ANSI/ISEA Z89.1-2014

    This standard provides performance and testing requirements for industrial helmets, commonly known as hard hats. It establishes the types and classes of protective helmets, depending on the type of hazard encountered.

    OSHA 29 CFR 1910.135

    Head Protection Requirements and Classifications of Hard Hats and Safety Helmets for general industry workers.

    OSHA 29 CFR 1926.100

    Head Protection Requirements and Classifications for head protection for construction, demolition, and renovation workers.

    Need help finding the perfect hard hat for your or your crew? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of hard hats

    Click here to download a poster version of this blog post from our Knowledge Base

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any fall protection equipment is used.

    Safety Helmets: Playlist


     

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  5. Protect Your Skull

    Kask Helmet

     

    Safety helmets­ – some call them hard hats – have been around for almost 100 years. Today’s helmets will protect your head much better than the leather or steamed canvas hats of the early 1900’s. The latest helmets on the market are lightweight, durable and comfortable. Early versions were very much not those things.

     

    Safety equipment that is comfortable to wear is really important. If workers feel the things they’re required to wear are uncomfortable, they could decide to wear them incorrectly or might not even wear them at all.

     

    If you’re in the tower climbing industry, you can use traditional construction hard hats, but they’re not ideal. They can be heavy, bulky, and restrictive. They also don’t usually have a chin strap. You don’t want to be at height and have your helmet slip off your head (and neither do the people on the ground)!

     

    Generally, helmets protect you from impact by using a suspension system which separates your skull from the helmet. That way, the shell can dent and absorb the blow. Another style uses a foam liner similar to a bike helmet. If the helmet gets hit, the foam liner deforms to absorb the impact. A deformed helmet can be replaced, a deformed head on the other hand… not so much.

     

    There are a couple basic kinds of safety helmets. ANSI Type I helmets protect against blows to the top of the head, and ANSI Type II helmets protect both the top and sides of the head. There should be a label on the shell of the helmet which shows which you have. You might also find something called a bump cap. These are not ANSI compliant, but they are great if you need to protect against scrapes and bumps.

     

    NFL Chiefs

    There are also different electrical classes of helmets. Class G is the general helmet. They’re intended to reduce the danger of exposure to low voltage. Class E helmets are for use with potential exposure to high voltage. No more than 20,000 volts, specifically. Class C helmets are considered conductive and should not be used if you’re working near electricity.

     

    Traditionally hard hats come in a few standard colors: white, red, yellow, maybe orange. You can also get them in blue, green, black, and even pink. Or maybe you’d like to show your fandom for a pro sports team. We can get you whichever team you like… no questions asked.

     

     

    A few specific helmets for tower climbing that we recommend are the Petzl Vertex Vent, Kask Super Plasma, and EVO 6151 Vent.  Be sure to watch our helmet comparison video to learn about all their great features. GME Supply is here to help you find a lightweight, comfortable helmet so you can Climb Higher!

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