Lifting & Rigging

  1. How to Mount a Capstan Hoist to a Swivel Mount

    Capstan hoists have become a staple in the lifting and rigging industry. They are a lightweight, versatile, and strong tool that can help make a crew’s day a little bit easier. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down how to properly mount a capstan hoist to a swivel mount.

    Size Matters


     

    Before we talk about the steps needed to properly mount the capstan hoist to the swivel bracket, it’s important for us to mention when you can use the swivel bracket. The swivel bracket can only be used with the 1,000 Pound Capstan Hoist. If you need to mount your 3,000 Pound Capstan Hoist, click here to check out our blog post on how to use the chain mount bracket.

    Assembling the Bracket


     

    The first part of mounting the capstan hoist requires assembling the bracket and attaching it to the truck.

    Step 1: Attaching the Swivel Plate to the Hitch

    Insert the swivel mount plate into a 2-inch hitch mount. The plate does not come with a key or pin to secure the plate onto the hitch. You will need to get a pin/key that fits the hitch you are using. **Do not use the setup until the plate is secured to the hitch with a pin/key.

    Step 2: Attaching the Swivel to the Plate

    The swivel bracket comes with four Grade 5 Bolts. Line the bracket up with the holes on the plate and secure the bracket into place with the included bolts. The bolts should be attached with the threads facing down. Ensure that you have tightened the bolts securely to hold the bracket in place.

    Step 3: Attaching the C-Bracket

    There is a pin on the back of the swivel mount bracket. This pin fits into the bottom of the C-Bracket to ensure that it is positioned correctly. Using a ½ inch allen wrench secure the C-Braket with the 4 provided screws.

    Step 4: Attaching the Capstan Hoist to the C-Bracket

    The C-Bracket has a pin on the back of it. This pin ensures that you will install the capstan hoist on the bracket correctly. The drum of the capstan hoist should be positioned directly above the center bolt of the swivel bracket. To correctly position the drum, make sure that the safety bar is on the back side of the load. Then, using the 6 screws that came with the C-Bracket, attach the capstan to the bracket.

    If you’ve got any questions about our selection of capstan hoists, mounts, accessories, or how to attach the hoist to a mount, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see the swivel mount bracket

    Click here to see the 1,000 pound capstan

    Click here to see our full selection of capstans and accessories

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Mounting the Capstan: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

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  2. Shackles 101

    When it comes to lifting and rigging, knowing the hardware you are using is an important part of safety. A common piece of hardware used in lifting and rigging is a shackle. A shackle is a metal link, typically U-shaped, closed by a bolt or screw. Shackles are typically made from forged steel to provide very high tensile strength. Many US contractors have begun requiring domestically made shackles. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down shackles.

    Domestic vs. Foreign


     

    It was mentioned above, but now it’s time to break it down further. Many US contractors have started requiring shackles that are made domestically. A domestic shackle is a shackle that has been made in the United States. They are often preferred to foreign made shackles due to better manufacturing and testing processes. Crosby, one of the most popular shackle manufacturers in the world, has a full selection of domestically manufactured shackles to meet your needs no matter what the job site requires.

    Screw Pin vs. Bolt Shackles


     

    Each job is unique and that means requirements are different. Not to mention, contractors may have preferences in addition to requiring domestic shackles. Apart from common things like U-shape size and capacity, the main difference between shackles will be whether they are a screw pin or a bolt shackle.

    Screw Pin

    A screw pin shackle is pretty self-explanatory. It is a type of shackle where the pin has a male threaded end, which tightens into the female threads in the body of the shackle. These shackles are popular because of their ease of use and are most commonly used on jobs that don’t require heavy duty attachment.

    Bolt

    A bolt shackle is pretty self-explanatory as well. It is a type of shackle where the pin has a male threaded end which is fed through the body of the shackle and secured with a bolt on the outside of the shackle. These shackles aren’t as easy to use as the screw pin shackles because of the requirements of securing the bolt to the pin. However, bolt type shackles are typically a better solution for jobs that require heavy duty attachment.

    Standards: ASME B30


     

    When it comes to lifting and rigging, which happens to include shackles – if you’re using them in a lifting and rigging capacity, the ASME B30 Standard is something that you need to be mindful of. The ASME B30 standard focuses on setting the standards for materials, rated loads, identification, inspection, repair, and removal. ASME B30 covers blocks and a range of other hardware used for lifting and rigging. We covered ASME B30 and provided a full breakdown of the standard in a previous blog post. You can find that post here.

    If you’ve got questions about shackles, standards, or domestic manufacturers, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of shackles

    Click here to see our full selection of Crosby hardware

    Click here to see our full selection of lifting and rigging equipment

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any Fall Protection Equipment is used.

    Shackles 101: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

     

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  3. Product Spotlight: The Sterling Pocket Hauler

    Certain situations call for a single person or team to lift an object or person that they normally wouldn’t be able to lift. That’s where mechanical advantage comes in. This week our Gear Experts® are going to talk about the Sterling Pocket Hauler and how it can provide a mechanical advantage for a range of applications.

    Mechanical Advantage


     

    First things first, let’s talk a bit about mechanical advantage. Mechanical advantage is “the advantage gained by the use of a mechanism in transmitting force; specifically: the ratio of the force that performs the useful work of a machine to the force that is applied to the machine”. Basically, mechanical advantage is the number of times the device multiplies the force you apply. Need to lift 60 pounds but only strong enough to lift 30? A device with a 2:1 (2 to 1) mechanical advantage will help you achieve that lift.

    The Pocket Hauler


     

    The Sterling Pocket Hauler is a small, lightweight, simple to operate system that provides a 4:1 or 5:1 mechanical advantage. This device makes lifting extremely easy for use in rescue, adjustable directional, tensioning, or a number of other rigging needs. The Sterling Pocket Haul System comes with everything you need to get the job done. It includes:

    → (1) 50’ 8 mm Rope with a Sewn Eye;

    → (2) Aluminum Mini-double Pulleys;

    → (2) Aluminum Auto lock Carabiners;

    → (1) 6 mm Prusik Cord; and

    → (1) Screwlink Carabiner

    **The pocket hauler does not come pre-rigged. But don’t worry – we’ve got you covered. You can check out our video on how to properly rig the Sterling Pocket Hauler Below.

    Save Energy


     

    To prove how much energy the Sterling Pocket Hauler’s mechanical advantage can save you, we did an experiment. In our experiment, we used a Rock Exotica Enforcer LC1 Load Cell to test the loads. We had a volunteer rig up to the haul system and used the Load Cell to show that he was 182 pounds. The next step was to change the configuration of the Load Cell to allow it to measure how much force was required to lift the volunteer using the haul system. In the 4:1 configuration it took 50 pounds of force to lift 182 pounds of weight. In the 5:1 configuration it only took 40 pounds of force to lift 182 pounds of weight.

    See the full experiment in the below video.

    Looking for more information about mechanical advantage or the Sterling Pocket Hauler? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®!

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Click here to check out the Sterling Pocket Hauler

    Click here to check out our full line of Sterling Products

    The Sterling Pocket Haul System: Video


     

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

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  4. Product Spotlight: The Rock Exotica MHP55

    The MHP55 from Rock Exotica has changed the game when it comes to lifting and rigging. This super-efficient, light, and versatile block is a must have for many rigging plans. This week our Gear Experts® are going to discuss why this block is such a great piece of equipment.

    ASME B30 Standard


     

    The Rock Exotica MHP55 meets the critical ASME B30 Standard for lifting and rigging. More specifically, Chapter 26-5 which covers rigging blocks, like those you would use with a capstan hoist on a tower. We covered the ASME B30 standard in a previous blog post. Click here to check out that blog post.

    Features


     

    This material handling 2.6 inch block features a red side plate to help differentiate it from other Omni-Block pulleys. The working load limit (WLL) is also a stout 4,500 pounds making it one of the strongest blocks in this category, even when compared to other steel blocks. A major advantage of this block is its ease of use. The side plates swing open, so you can install the rope while not detaching it from the system. Then, it locks back into place with a two-stage double-catch safety mechanism. The extremely efficient ball-bearing sheave reduces friction while lifting and rigging. It also has a swivel at the top to help the block align with the system. Last, but certainly not least, is rope compatibility. This block accepts ropes between 3/8 and ½ inch.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Click here to see the Rock Exotica MHP55 Omni-Block

    Click here to see our full selection of Rock Exotica Items

    Click here to see our full selection of Blocks

    Click here to see our ASME B30 Standard Guide

    The Ultimate Rigging Block


     

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has coming up in 2018. It will be exciting – we promise!

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    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

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