Rope

  1. The Cordage Institute: Fiber Rope Requirement Criteria

    The Cordage Institute: Fiber Rope Requirement Criteria

     

    The Cordage Institute

    When it comes to working at-height, inspecting your equipment can make all the difference in job site safety. We’ve covered rope inspection in a previous blog post. You can find that post by clicking here. This week our Gear Experts® are going to provide a broad overview of the organization that sets standards for inspection.

    The Cordage Institute


     

    Fiber rope standards are established by an organization called the Cordage Institute. The Cordage Institute was founded in 1920 and is comprised of a group of fiber rope manufacturers, their suppliers, and affiliated end-user organizations. While the cordage institute sets a wide variety of standards for a wide variety of uses, the standard that is of interest to our industry is the International Guideline for Fiber Rope Inspection and Retirement Criteria – specifically section 4 (CI 2001-04).

    In this post, we're giving a brief overview of the subject matter discussed in the Fiber Ropes, General Standard (CI-1201) which covers the general characteristics and requirements for all fiber cordage and ropes which you can order in full here.

    CI-1201


     

    As we mentioned above, CI-1201 covers the general characteristics and requirements for all fiber cordage and ropes. We'll touch on characteristics that are tested for like Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS), Working Load Limits (WLL), and Safety Factor and the different packaging requirements for commercial use.

    Rope Packaging Labels for Commercial Use

    When buying rope, a unit should have a label noting the product description, diameter/size, weight/length, material, minimum breaking strength (MBS) or working load, the manufacturer's name and address, and country of origin.  This is the basic set of variables you need to know to estimate how your rope will or will not work in a given scenario.

     

    Minimum Breaking Strength

    Simply put, minimum breaking strength (MBS) is the lowest amount of force required to break an object. As mentioned, MBS should be listed on the packaging label.

    Working Load Limit

    In order to determine the Working Load Limit (WLL), you will need to know the Minimum Breaking Strength. Each manufacturer's ratings are different due to different construction processes and materials. To figure for WLL, you will take the MBS and divide it by the Factor of Safety.  

    Factor of Safety

    The default safety factor to which synthetic rope can be subjected is one-tenth (10%) of the manufacturer's documented MBS. It's worth noting that the safety factor accounts for strength reductions associated with knotting/termination and losses in strength and efficiency as the rope passes through sheaves. This should help to explain why the safety factor exceeds the more common 5:1 factor found regularly in ASME B30 for other rigging components.

    So, if you have a 1/2'' Double Braid Polyester rope with an MBS of 11,000 lbs., and dividing your default safety factor of 10, you end up with a WLL of 1,100 lbs.

    11,000 MBS / 10 = 1,100 WLL

     

    More Rope Information:

    Get a free downloadable rope log or learn more about ropes in our Knowledge Base.

    If you’ve got any questions about rope, rope inspection, or rope retirement, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of rope.

    Click here to download your free rope inspection log.

    Click here to see all of our rope focused blog posts.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. The manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used. The use of rope and cordage products has inherent safety risks which are subject to highly variable conditions and which may change over time.

    Compliance with standards and guidelines of the Cordage Institute does not guarantee safe use under all circumstances, and the Institue disclaims any responsibility for accidents that may occur. if the user has any questions or uncertainties about the proper use of rope or cordage or about safe practices, consult a professional engineer or other qualified individuals.

    Rope Videos: The Playlist


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

     

    Get Social


     

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  2. Product Spotlight: Arbor Ropes from Sterling Rope

    Sterling Rope Tree Care

     

    Working in the tree care industry, like most at-height industries, requires a set of special equipment to keep you safe and get the job done right. One key piece of equipment rope. The week our Gear Experts® are going to break down some Sterling ropes specifically designed for our arborist friends in the tree care industry.

    Atlas Rig Line

    When you’re removing large trunk sections of a tree you need to know that your rigging system can handle and absorb large dynamic forces. Sterling has been designing ropes to handle large kinetic forces for over 20 years and they designed their Atlas Rig Line specifically for this purpose.

    Features

    The Atlas Rig Line is ideal for removing tree trunk sections, is available in blue and white, and comes in 150, 200, or 600-foot lengths. It is a 9/16” rope with a polyester sheath and nylon core. And, it offers a soft hand, easy knotability, and is designed to be used in a rope friction device, capstan hoist, or pulley.

    Specifications

    The specifications of this rope just go to prove that it means business. With a minimum breaking strength of 11,050 pounds and an average breaking strength of 13,750 pounds – this rope can handle nearly any job. And, it meets ANSI Z133.1 requirements.

    Scion Climbing Line

    Next, we are going to cover the Scion Climbing Line from Sterling. This rope was developed with climbing in mind. It has a very durable construction and has been designed to absorb large dynamic forces.

    Features

    The Scion Climbing Line is ideal for both Doubled Rope Technique (DdRT) and Single Rope Technique (SRT). It is an 11.5 mm rope with a 24-strand polyester cover. The double braided construction provides decreased elongation, easy hand, and great knotability. The tight, durable sheath allows the rope to handle mechanical devices and hardware well and sewn termination ends are available in all length and color options.

    Specifications

    Speaking of length and color options - this rope is available in orange, blue, and green. And, it comes in 150, 200, and 600-foot lengths. For standards, it meets both EN 1891 type A and ANSI Z133 requirements so you know this rope is up to the challenge.

    Click here to see the Sterling Rope Atlas Rig Line

    Click here to see the Sterling Rope Scion Climbing Line

    Click here to see our full selection of Sterling Rope Products

    Click here to see our full selection of tree care products

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Sterling Rope Arbor Ropes: The Video


    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  3. The Cordage Institute: Fiber Rope Inspection & Retirement Criteria

     

    The Cordage Institute

    When it comes to working at-height, inspecting your equipment can make all the difference in job site safety. We’ve covered rope inspection in a previous blog post. You can find that post by clicking here. This week our Gear Experts® are going to provide a broad overview of the organization that sets standards for inspection.

    The Cordage Institute


     

    Fiber rope standards are established by an organization called the Cordage Institute. The Cordage Institute was founded in 1920 and is comprised of a group of fiber rope manufacturers, their suppliers, and affiliated end-user organizations. While the cordage institute sets a wide variety of standards for a wide variety of uses, the standard that is of interest to our industry is the International Guideline for Fiber Rope Inspection and Retirement Criteria – specifically section 4 (CI 2001-04).

    CI 2001-04


     

    As we mentioned above, section four covers fiber rope inspection and retirement criteria. This section is further broken down into sub-sections that outline the different requirements for an effective inspection and retirement program.

    4.1.1

    Section 4.1.1 states that the user is responsible for establishing a program for inspection and retirement that considers conditions of use and degree of risk for the application. It outlines that a program should include:

    • Assignment of supervisory responsibility. Meaning that an individual should be made responsible for establishing the program, training and qualifying inspectors, and preserving records;
    • Written procedures;
    • Training;
    • Record keeping;
    • Establishment of retirement criteria for each application; and
    • Inspection schedules

    4.1.2

    Section 4.1.2 states that ropes that secure or control valuable assets or whose failure would cause serious damage, pollution, or threat to life warrant more scrutiny than ropes in non-critical use. It goes on to state that if a fiber rope is used in a highly demanding application, with potentially critical risks, the advice of a qualified person should be obtained when developing the specific inspection and retirement program.

    4.1.3

    Section 4.1.3 states that the user should continue to revise and refine the program based on experience.

    CI 2001-4.3


     

    Section 4.3 covers rope inspections logs. We have talked about the importance of a rope inspection log in this previous blog post. This section states “An important tool for rope evaluation is a log. This will include data on the type of rope, time in service and description of intended use. The details of every inspection should be entered in the log as to date, location and conclusions. The log should include a regular inspection schedule”.

    Most rope manufacturers include a rope log with their rope. However, if you don’t think it did, or you have lost it, we provide a free downloadable rope log in our Knowledge Base.

    CI 2001-5.1.1


     

    Section 5.1.1 covers rope tags. This is a tag that is attached to the rope that outlines the rope, model number, manufacturing date, MBS, and manufacturer. If this tag is illegible the rope should be retired immediately. If the rope does not come with a tag you can make your own. Also, using shrink tube is an inexpensive solution to attach your tag to a rope and keep it protected.

    Rope Inspection


     

    Section 6 outlines rope inspection. We took a deep dive into rope inspection in this previous blog post. It also talks about rope care & maintenance – like rope wash which we talked about in this blog post. Last, but not least, it covers proper rope storage. We covered rope storage in this blog post.

    Rope Retirement


     

    If a rope’s tag is illegible or if it no longer passes inspection, it is time to retire the rope and purchase a new one. Rope retirement doesn’t mean just throw the rope back in your truck or trailer, it means cutting the rope into pieces so small that it would no longer be useful for a crew to try and use.

    If you’ve got any questions about rope, rope inspection, or rope retirement, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of rope.

    Click here to download your free rope inspection log.

    Click here to see all of our rope focused blog posts.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Rope Videos: The Playlist


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

     

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  4. Rope Protection 101

    Rope is one of the most versatile pieces of equipment in at-height work. Whether you are using it as a lifeline or for lifting and rigging, knowing and caring for your rope can often be the difference between life and death. We’ve discussed rope inspection and the importance of caring for your rope by washing it in previous blog posts. This week, our Gear Experts® are going to break down rope protection.

    Rope Protection: Overview


     

    Rope protection is, wait for it…, the act of protecting your rope from being damaged by things like sharp edges. It is done with the use of a piece of equipment that has been specifically designed to protect rope against edges. The most common situation that creates a need for rope protection is the inability to properly anchor your rope directly overhead. In many rescue and rope access situations your rope may have to come into contact with an edge that isn’t exactly designed to be safe for rope. Whether it’s a building, beam, or rock face, that type of contact can cause unnecessary abrasion and ultimately decrease the life of your rope.

    How to Protect Your Rope


     

    There are two major types of rope protection: rope guards and mechanical rope protectors.

    Mechanical Rope Protectors

    Petzl P68 Caterpillar Rope Protector

    Mechanical rope protectors, like the Petzl P68 Caterpillar or DBI Sala 8700302 Rope Protector, are usually made from metal links with rollers in the center. The metal links are connected by smaller links that allow for flexibility over edges. The rope can move up and down on the rollers as needed providing a smooth process and preventing any damage caused by the edges. Mechanical rope protectors are more expensive than rope guards because of their metal construction.

    Rope Guard

    Sterling SafeGuard Rope ProtectorRope guards, like the Sterling SafeGuard or the PMI Supermantle Rope Protector, are much more economically friendly and lighter than their mechanical counterparts. While each rope guard is constructed a little bit differently, the basic functionality is the same. They work by covering the rope (usually with some form of canvas) and allowing the rope to slide through the guard when it needs to move up or down an edge.

    For more information on rope protection solutions, or any questions about rope, rope inspection, or proper rope care, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Click here to check out our rope focused blog posts.

    Click here to see our full selection of rope protection solutions.

    Rope Protection: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    Gear Up with Gear ExpertsIf you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  5. Rope 201

    When it comes to working in at-height, industry, and construction, one of your most important assets is your rope. The more you know about rope, how to use it, care for it, and what options you have, the safer you can be while on the job. This week our Gear Experts® are going to dive deeper into rope and talk about knots, termination options, and rope retirement.

    We Kid You Knot


     

    Knots go almost hand in hand with rope. And while tying knots is an important skill to have when working with rope, it’s equally important to understand and recognize the effects that knots have on rope. Knots can severely decrease the overall strength of the rope – which can be extremely dangerous. The decrease in rope strength isn’t only while the knot is tied but can be a lasting effect that continues after the knot is untied. This reduction in strength is due to crimping and twisting that is often irreversible.

    Serious, or Knot


     

    So, while we’ve established that knots decrease overall strength, we haven’t talked about how much of a decrease you will see. Knots can decrease rope strength by up to 50% - a number that can be catastrophic in a life safety or overhead scenario. It’s important to note that the decrease in strength can vary depending on the rope composition and manufacturer instructions should be followed.

    Recent studies have shown that a figure 8 knot (a knot commonly used to create a looped termination at the end of a rope) causes rope to break at 75-80% of their typical strength. This decrease in MBS (minimum breaking strength) could be enough to put the capacity of the rope below required safety factors.

    While the decrease in strength and other effects on rope can be serious, knots are commonly tied in ropes to create an attachment point to secure the rope to a structure or object. There are other options available for attaching rope to a structure or object that don’t decrease the strength of a rope by anywhere near the amount that a knot does.

    Termination Options


     

    Like we mentioned above, there are plenty of options for securing rope to objects or structures without using a knot. Those options are termination plates, factory sewn or spliced eyes, and factory installed connectors.

    Termination Plates

    A termination plate is a piece of hardware, typically made from milled aluminum, which has multiple holes. Rope is fed through these holes in a specific pattern, leaving the main hole at the end of the plate as an attachment point.

    Factory Sewn or Spliced Eyes

    Many rope manufacturers offer sewn eyes for kernmantle and double braid ropes, or hand spliced terminations for 3-strand ropes. These terminations are designed to drastically reduce the stress put on the rope to minimize strength loss. They also typically include a protective thimble or abrasion resistant sleeve to further protect the rope at the stress points.

    Factory Installed Connectors

    Rope manufacturers can also include hardware connection options. For example, snaphooks with swivels are included on many lifelines to make attachment easier.

    Retire Your Rope


     

    While terminations help maintain strength and add longevity to rope, it’s still important to regularly inspect your rope and retire it if the rope is not fit for continued use. For more information about how to inspect a rope and when it is time to retire the rope, check out our Rope Inspection 101 blog post.

    Free Poster


     

    We’ve also turned this blog post into a free downloadable poster available in our Knowledge Base. The poster includes all of the information and pictures included in this blog post.

    Click here to see our selection of rope

    Click here to see our selection of termination plates

    Click here to see our selection of rope accessories

    Click here to check out our rope related blog posts

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Rope: The Playlist


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  6. The Ultimate Tree Care Equipment Guide

    The tree care industry is an important part of our world. Arborists and other tree care professionals dedicate their lives to keeping people and homes safe, planting trees, and caring for trees to allow them to thrive and preserve nature for the next generation. But that doesn’t mean that tree care is a “walk in the park”. It’s a dangerous job and the equipment that tree care professionals use can be the difference between a job well done and a terrible or even fatal accident. This week our Gear Experts® are going to outline the must-have equipment for every tree care professional.

    Harness


     

    Spending all day climbing trees is by no means easy. Having a comfortable harness can help make the job a little bit easier, though. A harness is one of the most important gear choices you will make. Not only will you be wearing it for most of the day, but it is where all of your other gear comes together to keep you safe and productive on the job. Some things to look for when choosing your tree care harness include padding, back support, D-rings and connection loops, and shoulder straps.

    Padding can truly be the difference between comfort and misery. Having padding strategically placed in areas like leg supports and shoulder straps can have a huge impact on productivity. Back supports can come in handy, too. Working at-height isn’t exactly gentle on the back. A high-quality back support helps you push through to get the job done. Depending on what type of work you will be doing, how much gear you need to take with you, and whether you need additional support, additional D-rings, connection points, and shoulder straps are all things to consider.

    Pulleys


     

    Pulleys can be useful for a variety of tree care projects. The type of pulley and the capabilities that it has will depend on what you are trying to accomplish. However, some things to look for when picking a pulley will include the weight, max rope size, sheave, and if it is a single or double pulley.

    When you are spending all day climbing trees, the last thing you want to have to deal with is a bunch of heavy equipment weighing you down and tiring you out. If you don’t need a huge pulley that is made of a heavy material saving the weight will be well worth it in the long run. Now imagine getting to the job site, getting everything set up, and realizing that the pulley you need to complete the job doesn’t work with the rope you brought. That is why it is important to consider max rope size when selecting a pulley.

    The sheave is the grooved wheel that is mounted inside the pulley that holds the rope in place. A sheave spins on an axle or bearing inside the frame of the pulley. The reason why it is important to pay attention to the sheave is that they come in a number of different shapes which are designed for different styles of ropes and wires. Whether or not the pulley is a single or double just depends on what you will be using the pulley for.

    Rope, Rope Devices, and Hitch Cords


     

    Pulleys and a harness aren’t very effective without rope. Not only does rope protect you from hitting the ground in the event of a fall, but it can also serve a range of other purposes. Those purposes can be amplified with rope devices and accessories. Things like ascenders, fall arresters, throw bags, rigging plates, swivels, and a whole slew of different devices can help you achieve your rope’s full potential.

    Saws


     

    A saw (whether handheld or mechanical) is pretty much required when it comes to tree care because cutting down or trimming a tree with your bare hands isn’t easy (trust us… we tried). The type of saw that will be best for the job will depend on what you are doing. For example, if you are pruning trees, a hand saw might be more effective. On the flipside, if you are cutting at the base of the tree, a chainsaw will be more effective.

    If you’ve got questions about tree care or finding the right equipment to get the job done, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Click here to see our full selection of tree care gear

    Arborist Saddle Comparison: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

     

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  7. Rope Bag Buying Guide

    Rope, it’s something that every at-height worker needs on a job site, but it’s not always the easiest part of your gear to transport. Imagine getting to your location – ready to get the day started – and having to spend an hour untangling your rope, just to find out that it accidentally got cut in your trailer while being transported. Not only did you waste an hour of your morning, but now you have to take that rope out of service because it is no longer safe to use. This week our Gear Experts® are going to cover rope bags and things to look at when you’re on the hunt for one.

    Rope Bags


     

    Rope bags are pretty self-explanatory. They are bags designed to hold and transport rope (we were shocked when we first found out too…). While all rope bags have the same purpose, to store and transport rope, there are a few things to consider when looking at rope bags.

    What to Look for in a Rope Bag


     

    When you first look at the selection of diverse rope bags that are available it can be overwhelming. But, if you break down all of the different features, and what will suit your rope and your unique application it can be pretty simple. Some things to consider are color, size, document pockets, additional storage compartments, applications, and straps.

    Color

    Color is more of an organizational benefit than anything. Having ropes of different types (Kernmantle, Double Braid, or 3-Strand) or ropes for specific applications in different colored bags can help keep you organized and streamline the process of grabbing the specific rope you need when you need it.

    Size

    Ropes come in a range of sizes – and that means that rope bags do, too. Going through dozens of rope bags individually to try and find the size you need can take a lot of time. That’s why we made this handy chart.

    Document Pockets

    Document pockets make staying safe and compliant easy, they also allow for quick labeling. Many rope bags feature document pockets where you can store your rope inspection forms, labels to help keep your gear organized and any other pertinent information about your rope. We cover rope inspection in this blog post.

    Additional Storage

    Some rope bags simply store rope, but sometimes you need more out of your bag. If you want the ability to store additional gear, like carabiners, you’ll want additional pockets in your bag.

    Applications

    Most rope bags will work for all of your applications, but there are some situations where specialty or unique bags may serve a better purpose. For example, if you are going to be around a lot of water – having a waterproof bag can prevent your rope from getting damaged. If you don’t typically work around water, then a bag that has small holes in the bottom (gusseted) to allow the rope to breathe will be sufficient. One important aspect of rope care is washing your rope – if you want to use a washing machine you’ll need to put your rope in a laundry bag.

    Straps

    The last thing on our list of considerations when picking a rope bag is what type of straps it has. The rope bag is great for storing and protecting a rope, but it still has to be carried around the job site. Having comfortable straps is always something to keep in mind, as well as if it has one strap or a setup more like backpack straps.

    If you need more information about choosing the right rope bag or would like help picking the bag best for you, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of Rope Bags

    Click here to see our full selection of Rope

    Click here to check out all of our rope related blog posts

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  8. Vertical Systems

    You’re in the business of climbing. Whether you work in the tower, wind, solar, billboard, construction, or utility industry, chances are you will spend a decent amount of time climbing. Here at GME Supply we hold the safety of at-height workers above all else and that’s why this week our Gear Experts® are here to talk about vertical systems.

    Types of Vertical Systems


     

    Vertical systems come in two types: Vertical Lifeline and Ladder Fall Protection Systems. Vertical lifeline systems utilize rope and rope devices to provide fall protection, whereas ladder systems utilize a ladder, cable, and a cable safety sleeve (cable grab).

    Vertical Lifeline Systems


     

    When a ladder system is not already installed on a site a vertical lifeline system is going to be your only option. A vertical lifeline system is used by anchoring rope (either kernmantle or 3-strand rope) onto an anchor point and using a rope grab (fall arrester) like the Petzl ASAP Mobile Rope Grab or the Petzl ASAP Lock to provide fall protection.  Choosing the right kind of rope is important and don’t worry - we’ve got you covered there too! Click here to see our comprehensive rope buying guide.

    Ladder Fall Protection Systems (Cable Climb Systems)


     

    A ladder fall protection system, better known as a cable climb system, is pre-installed on a tower and features a cable attached to the ladder. You can use a cable grab attached to your sternal D-ring to move up and down the ladder with ease. In the event of a fall the cable safety sleeve will lock onto the cable and arrest the fall. Applications for ladder fall protection systems include towers, billboards, commercial buildings, utility, solar, and wind.

    The brand new 3M DBI Sala Lad-Saf Cable Vertical 2 Person Safety System revolutionizes the Ladder Safety Category. It is available in lengths ranging from 20 to 100 feet and comes in both stainless steel and galvanized cable options.

    We also offer a full line of Tuf-Tug cable climb systems that come in a variety of designs and sizes. The monopole system is available in standard lengths of 100’, 150’, 200’, and 250’. The fixed ladder system is available in standard lengths of 100’, 200’, 250’, 300’, and 400’. And, the round climbing leg system is available in standard lengths of 150’, 200’, 250’, and 300’.

    These systems can be further customized. Contact our Gear Experts® for more information about customization.

    Walking Working Surfaces


     

    Effective January 17th, 2017 the new requirements for OSHA Standard 1910 Subpart D went into effect. This standard outlines the new requirements for walking working surfaces. Section 1910.29, which covers fall protection systems, states that fall protection systems should be permanently installed when possible so that they are available whenever potential exposure to fall hazards exist. Personal protective equipment (PPE), including fall protection, must be provided by the employer at no cost to the employee. Each section of the new 1910 Subpart D standard has a different compliance date ranging from May 2017 through November 2036. You can find the complete list of compliance dates here.

    For more information on vertical systems, or if you have questions about what equipment will work best for you, click here to connect with one of our Gear Experts®

    Click here [insert link here] to see our full selection of vertical systems

    Click here [insert link here] to see our full selection of ropes & lifelines

    Click here [insert link here] to see our full selection of rope devices

    Click here [insert link here] to see our full selection of cable climb systems

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    3M DBI Sala Lad Saf Cable Vertical Safety System: The Video


    Tuf-Tug Cable Climb Systems: The Video


     

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  9. Pelican Static Kernmantle Rope

    Pelican Rope | Static Kernmantle Rope | GME Supply

    Static kernmantle rope is a great rope for industrial applications. Here at GME Supply we pride ourselves in being America’s premier rope supplier and this week our Gear Experts® are going to talk about Pelican Static Kernmantle Rope.

    Pelican Static Kernmantle


     

    Pelican Rope’s static kernmantle is available in 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, and 5/8 inch diameters. Depending on the diameter there is also a range of colors to choose from. This rope features a durable, chemical resistant, polyester cover, over a nylon core. It provides great energy absorption while still being firm, yet flexible for tying knots or passing through a pulley. Pelican further strengthens this rope by steam setting the cover over the core to prevent slippage.

    Depending on the diameter it has an MBS (minimum breaking strength) of 6,400 pounds for the 3/8 inch all the way up to 13,000 pounds for the 5/8 inch. While kernmantle has a lot of benefits, it isn’t the perfect rope for every application. If you need pulling rope for your capstan hoist you will want to use double braid rope.

    Knowledge is Power


     

    What is kernmantle rope? Kernmantle consists of twisted parallel fibers surrounded by a tightly braided sheath. For more information on the different types of rope and how to find the perfect rope for the job at hand check out our Rope Buying Guide.

    Not only is it important to find the perfect rope, but it is important to frequently inspect your rope. Rope inspection ensures that your rope is safe to use when you take it out on the job. Most rope manufacturers include a rope inspection form with the rope. But, if your rope didn’t come with one or you lost it, you can download one for free here from our knowledge base. For more information on rope inspection check out our Rope Inspection 101 blog post here.

    Last, but not least, is the importance of washing your rope. Rope wash can help extend the life of your rope and ensure that you and your crew are safe while on the job. For more information on how to properly wash a rope check out our blog post on The Importance of Rope Wash.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Looking for more information on Pelican Static Kernmantle Rope? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of Pelican Static Kernmantle Rope

    Click here to see our full selection of Pelican products

    Click here to see our full selection of Rope

    Pelican Static Kernmantle Rope: The Video


     

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  10. The Importance of Rope Wash

    We talk a lot about rope, but that’s because rope is so important. We’ve said it before, and we will say it again: in at-height work, many times, your rope is literally your lifeline. This week our Gear Experts® are going to outline rope wash and offer a refresh on proper rope inspection.

    Rope Wash


     

    What is rope wash? Well, the name is self-explanatory, it is a washing solution for your rope. Rope wash is important because it helps keep your rope clean by removing dirt and grime. A clean rope typically lasts longer than an unclean rope so, not only does it help keep you safe, but it also helps save you money. All of the rope wash we offer (single packs and a case of 20) are chemical free. Chemical free rope wash will not break down any of the fibers in your rope, this ensures that no damage is caused by the washing process. For optimal care results rope should be washed after approximately 30-40 uses. Each packet of rope wash has enough soap for one wash and can be used to wash your rope by hand, washing machine, or in a tub of water.

    Inspection


     

    Each time you use your rope, you should perform a visual inspection to ensure it’s safe to use. Check for cuts, nicks, burns, excess fraying, flat or uneven spots, glossing, discoloration from sun exposure or chemicals, or inconsistencies in the rope. Refer to the manufacturer's recommendations for complete inspection and usage instructions. When inspecting your rope, it is much easier to keep track of your inspections with a Rope Inspection Log. Some manufacturers provide logs with their rope, but if your rope doesn’t come with one, or if you lost it, click here to download one for free from our knowledge base.

    Got more questions about rope wash? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®!

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Click here to check out our selection of rope wash

    Click here to check out our Rope Inspection 101 blog post

    Click here to check out Rope Buying Guide

    Click here to check out our full selection of Rope

    Click here to check out our free Rope Inspection Log

    How To Wash Your Rope


     

    Get Social


     

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    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

     

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