Rescue

  1. Product Spotlight: Petzl I'D

    When it comes to safely lowering yourself down a rope, a descender is one of the most valuable tools in your arsenal. But, as with most things in this world, there are a ton of different choices and knowing which one will best fit your applications can be difficult. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the Petzl I’D Self-Breaking Rope Descender.

    Designed for Ease of Use


     

    The Petzl I’D has been expertly designed by Petzl for ease of use. With very little effort you can lower a load safely to the ground in a smooth, controlled fashion. This can make situations, like rescues, where a rough descent could cause potential dangers easier for everyone involved. Not to mention it can make part of the everyday job easier, too.

    Features


     

    The Petzl I’D has been jam-packed with valuable features including anti-panic, anti-error, locking mechanisms, and a multi-function handle.

    Anti-Panic

    The anti-panic function helps ensure that if the operator starts to descend too fast, they won’t lose control. Essentially if the operator pulls the handle too hard the brakes kick in and automatically stop the descent.

    Anti-Error

    Unfortunately, sometimes certain situations (like rescues) can cause high stress which can lead to equipment being rigged incorrectly. With the anti-error function of the Petzl I’D you don’t have to worry about costly mistakes being made during high-stress situations. The Petzl I’D has been designed with an anti-error function that renders the device useless unless the rope has been inserted the correct way. While the anti-error function can reduce the risk of accidents caused by high-stress situations, it is highly recommended that each member of your crew obtains training on both the equipment being used and the possible situations they will encounter while on the job.

    Locked

    The Petzl I’D features a moving side plate – which is how the rope is inserted into the device. Petzl has also designed a way to lock the side plate with a screw. This allows the devices to be integrated into evacuation kits.

    Multi-Function

    With ease of use in mind, the Petzl I’D features a multi-function handle that unlocks the rope and controls the descent with one hand. This one hand control allows the user to always keep a free hand on the end of the rope for added control and security.

    Sizes & Specs


     

    The Petzl I’D comes in two different sizes: the Petzl I’D D200S0 Small Self-Breaking Rope Descender and the Petzl I’D D200L0 Large Self-Breaking Rope Descender. Both descenders have been tested and certified to meet EN 341 Class A, CE EN 12841 type C, ANSI Z359.4, NFPA 1983 Technical Use, and EAC.

    The small Petzl I’D (D200S0) is for ropes between 10mm (.39”) and 11.5mm (.45”) in diameter. The large Petzl I’D (D200L0) is intended for ropes between 11.5mm (.45”) and 13mm (.51”) in diameter.

    Click here to see our selection of Petzl I’D Self-Breaking Rope Descenders

    Click here to see our selection of Petzl Gear

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Petzl I’D: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

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  2. ANSI Standard for Descent Devices

    Few devices in your gear bag are as versatile as your descender. Whether you need to descend quickly, slowly over time, or perform a rescue, this device can do it all and keep you safe in the process. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the ANSI Standards for descent devices.

    ANSI Z359.4-2013


     

    ANSI Z359.4-2013 outlines the safety requirements for assisted-rescue and self-rescue systems, subsystems and components. I know what you’re thinking: that title doesn’t say anything about descent devices. But, in the scope of the standard, it does mention descent control devices. An important clarification for you to know is that this standard is for rescue, not work positioning. We will cover more about that later.

    Section 3.2.7: Descent Devices


     

    The ANSI Z359.4-2013 standard is further broken down by sections. Section 3.2.7 specifically covers descent devices and is broken down into additional subsections for additional clarification.

    Section 3.2.7.1

    Section 3.2.7.1 covers descent energy and capacity for both single-use and multiple use devices.

    Section 3.2.7.2

    This section looks at descent speed – setting requirements for the maximum distance that you can lower yourself. For devices like the Petzl I’D Small Self-Braking Rope Descender or WestFall Pro D4 Descender for 7/16” Rope the maximum descent speed is 6.6 feet per second.

    Section 3.2.7.3

    This section covers static strength. Static strength is defined as a singular force being put on the device. Think of this a constant rate of force – similar to holding and maintaining a load.

    Section 3.2.7.4

    Section 3.2.7.4 covers dynamic strength. Dynamic strength is defined as a peak force being put on the device. Think of this as a sudden shock of force – similar to the force that is exerted in the event of a fall.

    Section 3.2.7.5

    This final section covers the general function of the device. This is where features like anti-panic come into play. If excessive force is applied or if you let go of the device completely, the device should halt the descent within 6 inches.

    Work Positioning


     

    Earlier we mentioned that the ANSI Z359.4-2013 standard is for rescue and not work positioning. In fact, at the time of this writing, there is no ANSI Standard that covers the use of descent devices for work positioning. This doesn’t make them unsafe or mean they are not suitable for work positioning. It just means that no official standard has been released for specifications and requirements. Devices like the Petzl I’D or WestFall Pro D4 are great devices for descending down to work in suspension in a range of situations like on a tower, painting, or cleaning windows. Of course, you still need to have proper fall arrest in place like a rope grab on a backup lifeline or an SRL.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any fall protection equipment is used.

    Not sure which descender is right for you or have questions about the ANSI Z359.4-2013 Standard? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see the Petzl I’D Small Self-Braking Rope Descender

    Click here to see the WestFall Pro D4 Descender

    Click here to see our full selection of Descenders

    ANSI Standard for Descent Devices: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts®: The Podcast


    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated
    to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® will be coming to your ears in early 2019 and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show, and sign up to get alerted when our first episode drops, head on over to gearexperts.com. There's a trailer there too, so you can get a sneak peek of the show.

    Get social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

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    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  3. Product Spotlight: Sterling Rope PDQ Tower Emergency Descent System

    In a perfect world, we would never have to talk about emergency situations. But, sometimes accidents happen and here a GME Supply we take pride in helping keep you safe on the job – and better informed about what gear can help when you need it the most. This week our Gear Experts® are going to cover the Sterling Rope PDQ Tower Emergency Descent System.

    What’s Included


     

    An emergency system isn’t very useful if it doesn’t have the gear needed to handle the situation in a safe and effective manner. So, let’s go over what is included in the Sterling Rope PDQ Tower Emergency Descent System.

    Descent Device

    This system features the Sterling Rope PDQ Control Descent Device. The PDQ Device is made from lightweight high strength aluminum and has an asymmetric cam, features hands-free lock-off, and an anti-panic feature. It weighs only 6.8 ounces and has an MBS of 13.3 kN.

    Rope

    Depending on the needs of your system you can get two different lengths of rope – 100 mm (328 ft) or 120 mm (394 ft). The rope is 6 mm XTEC Technora heat resistant high strength rope. It features a Technora sheath and the core offers maximum cut and abrasion resistance.

    Carabiners

    There are 2 ASD carabiners included in the system. They are auto-locking D-Shaped aluminum carabiners with a threaded captive eye pin and 3,600 lb gate.

    Bag

    The bag completes the system and provides an easy way to take the system up and down a tower. It is a weatherproof bag that also provides storage protection. The low profile roll top bag includes a shoulder strap for ease of transportation and has a 22-liter capacity.

    Features


     

    The Sterling Rope PDQ Escape System is lightweight and strong, making it ideal for tower, wind turbine, and other at-height applications. It is heat resistant to over 900°F, is rated up to 310 lbs., and meets ANSI Z359.4. The kit comes fully assembled and ready for fast deployment and it weighs under 10 lbs. – 8.85 lbs. to be exact.

    Mechanical Advantage


     

    If you’re looking to gain some mechanical advantage with the PDQ system you can easily pair it with the Sterling Rope PDQ Raise and Rescue Kit. The micro pulleys and anchor slings in this kit help to convert the PDQ Tower Descent kit to a mechanical advantage system for raising a fallen worker and transferring them to a lowering system.

    Click here to see the Sterling Rope PDQ Tower Emergency Descent System

    Click here to see the Sterling Rope PDQ Raise and Rescue Kit

    Click here to see our full selection of Sterling Rope Products

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Sterling Rope PDQ Tower Emergency Descent System: The Video


     

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  4. Product Spotlight: The Sterling Pocket Hauler

    Certain situations call for a single person or team to lift an object or person that they normally wouldn’t be able to lift. That’s where mechanical advantage comes in. This week our Gear Experts® are going to talk about the Sterling Pocket Hauler and how it can provide a mechanical advantage for a range of applications.

    Mechanical Advantage


     

    First things first, let’s talk a bit about mechanical advantage. Mechanical advantage is “the advantage gained by the use of a mechanism in transmitting force; specifically: the ratio of the force that performs the useful work of a machine to the force that is applied to the machine”. Basically, mechanical advantage is the number of times the device multiplies the force you apply. Need to lift 60 pounds but only strong enough to lift 30? A device with a 2:1 (2 to 1) mechanical advantage will help you achieve that lift.

    The Pocket Hauler


     

    The Sterling Pocket Hauler is a small, lightweight, simple to operate system that provides a 4:1 or 5:1 mechanical advantage. This device makes lifting extremely easy for use in rescue, adjustable directional, tensioning, or a number of other rigging needs. The Sterling Pocket Haul System comes with everything you need to get the job done. It includes:

    → (1) 50’ 8 mm Rope with a Sewn Eye;

    → (2) Aluminum Mini-double Pulleys;

    → (2) Aluminum Auto lock Carabiners;

    → (1) 6 mm Prusik Cord; and

    → (1) Screwlink Carabiner

    **The pocket hauler does not come pre-rigged. But don’t worry – we’ve got you covered. You can check out our video on how to properly rig the Sterling Pocket Hauler Below.

    Save Energy


     

    To prove how much energy the Sterling Pocket Hauler’s mechanical advantage can save you, we did an experiment. In our experiment, we used a Rock Exotica Enforcer LC1 Load Cell to test the loads. We had a volunteer rig up to the haul system and used the Load Cell to show that he was 182 pounds. The next step was to change the configuration of the Load Cell to allow it to measure how much force was required to lift the volunteer using the haul system. In the 4:1 configuration it took 50 pounds of force to lift 182 pounds of weight. In the 5:1 configuration it only took 40 pounds of force to lift 182 pounds of weight.

    See the full experiment in the below video.

    Looking for more information about mechanical advantage or the Sterling Pocket Hauler? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®!

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Click here to check out the Sterling Pocket Hauler

    Click here to check out our full line of Sterling Products

    The Sterling Pocket Haul System: Video


     

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  5. Product Spotlight: Petzl Jag

    This week we are going to talk about the Petzl Jag 4:1 Self Contained Haul System. The Jag is an extremely versatile system offering a 4:1 mechanical advantage making it useful in a variety of applications such as pickoffs, tensioning, and making a releasable anchor. In this week's blog our Gear Experts® are going to give you the full scoop on the Petzl Jag.

    What is Included in the System?


     

    The Petzl Jag System Haul Kit features an 8-millimeter rope, two Petzl Am’D Triact-Lock aluminum carabiners, a Petzl P45 Jag High Efficiency Double Pulley, and a Petzl P54 Jag Traxion High Efficiency Double Progress Capture Pulley. The Jag System Haul Kit is available in one, two, and five-meter versions. This system is also color coded. The victim is in the black and the operator is in the yellow. It makes it super easy for you to grab and with a single glance know which end is which.

    The Breakdown


    The Top

    The top part of the system is the Jag Traxion High Efficiency Double Progress Capture Pulley. This pulley has a cam built into the top to capture the progress when you’re raising the load. It also has a becket, so you can tie off the rope there, and it has two very efficient pulleys which together give about 91% efficiency – that’s high for a pulley of this size. To start the haul, you simply lock the cam down onto the rope.

    The Bottom

    The bottom part of the unit uses the very lightweight and small Jag High Efficiency Double Pulley. This pulley features sheaves mounted on the ball bearing for increased efficiency and can hold rope between 8 and 11 millimeters.

    Perfect for Rescue


     

    This system is great for any situation when you’d need to raise someone off their dorsal d-ring. The one-meter version is the perfect length for getting someone who’s fallen on the dorsal d-ring, busted their shock pack, and is hanging in a position where they may get suspension trauma. The rope is attached to the Traxion Pulley with a sewn termination and the other end of the rope has a sewn termination with a knot in it to prevent it from slipping through the pulley.

    Closed System Capability


     

    There may come a time where you want this system to be closed. What we mean by a closed system is that you will want the system to be tamper proof. To set up this system simply remove the bottom carabiner and replace it with the Petzl P28 Ring Open Multi-Directional Gated Ring. You should connect the ring to a Petzl I’D. The ring is then closed with a 3mm allen key. After that, you can lock the Petzl I’D as well. Click here for instructions on how to lock your Petzl I’D.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any fall protection equipment is used.

    Got more questions about the Petzl Jag? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see the Petzl Jag

    Click here to see our full selection of Petzl Items

    The Petzl Jag Self-Contained Haul System


     

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

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    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

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