Fall Protection

  1. Product Spotlight: Arbor Ropes from Sterling Rope

    Sterling Rope Tree Care

     

    Working in the tree care industry, like most at-height industries, requires a set of special equipment to keep you safe and get the job done right. One key piece of equipment rope. The week our Gear Experts® are going to break down some Sterling ropes specifically designed for our arborist friends in the tree care industry.

    Atlas Rig Line

    When you’re removing large trunk sections of a tree you need to know that your rigging system can handle and absorb large dynamic forces. Sterling has been designing ropes to handle large kinetic forces for over 20 years and they designed their Atlas Rig Line specifically for this purpose.

    Features

    The Atlas Rig Line is ideal for removing tree trunk sections, is available in blue and white, and comes in 150, 200, or 600-foot lengths. It is a 9/16” rope with a polyester sheath and nylon core. And, it offers a soft hand, easy knotability, and is designed to be used in a rope friction device, capstan hoist, or pulley.

    Specifications

    The specifications of this rope just go to prove that it means business. With a minimum breaking strength of 11,050 pounds and an average breaking strength of 13,750 pounds – this rope can handle nearly any job. And, it meets ANSI Z133.1 requirements.

    Scion Climbing Line

    Next, we are going to cover the Scion Climbing Line from Sterling. This rope was developed with climbing in mind. It has a very durable construction and has been designed to absorb large dynamic forces.

    Features

    The Scion Climbing Line is ideal for both Doubled Rope Technique (DdRT) and Single Rope Technique (SRT). It is an 11.5 mm rope with a 24-strand polyester cover. The double braided construction provides decreased elongation, easy hand, and great knotability. The tight, durable sheath allows the rope to handle mechanical devices and hardware well and sewn termination ends are available in all length and color options.

    Specifications

    Speaking of length and color options - this rope is available in orange, blue, and green. And, it comes in 150, 200, and 600-foot lengths. For standards, it meets both EN 1891 type A and ANSI Z133 requirements so you know this rope is up to the challenge.

    Click here to see the Sterling Rope Atlas Rig Line

    Click here to see the Sterling Rope Scion Climbing Line

    Click here to see our full selection of Sterling Rope Products

    Click here to see our full selection of tree care products

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Sterling Rope Arbor Ropes: The Video


    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social

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  2. Safety Training 101

    Safety LMS Online Training | Safety Training 101 | GME Supply

     

    It’s no secret that at-height work is dangerous and at GME Supply we pride ourselves in helping keep the dedicated men and women in at-height, industry, and construction safe and productive on the job. When talking about safety, a lot of people focus on the equipment. But the equipment is only half of the safety equation. After all, if you don’t know how to properly use the safety equipment you have it might not keep you safe. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down some key things to keep in mind when selecting training courses for your crew.

     

    Quality


    The quality of the courses you choose will directly affect your training experience, what information and/or techniques you learn, and your ability to continue to practice once the training is over. Here is a list of things to find out about the training company before you invest your hard-earned money in their courses.

    1. Where did the company’s curriculum come from? You want to make sure that their curriculum covers not only the things you need to legally know but also best practices and tip/tricks for self-training and continued education.
    2. How old is the company’s curriculum? Safety training companies aren’t always known for having up-to-date materials. But there are a few companies out there, like our friends at Safety LMS,  who have committed to updating curriculum a minimum of once a year. Safety LMS knows that things can change faster than most people think and that staying up-to-date is the best way to keep crews safe.
    3. Who is teaching the classes? Having an instructor who simply stands in front of you and reads right out of the book doesn’t exactly make for an enjoyable class. Beyond that, someone with no on-the-job experience in the class they are teaching can create a disconnect with students. Finding a training company where the instructors have experience in the industry and who can do more than reading from a book can not only make the class more exciting, but it can give additional insight into the industry and make Q&A sessions easier.

     

    Cost


    Cost is something that no one is immune to. Whether you are the biggest company in the country or a one crew team just trying to get off of the ground, spending money can often times be stressful. Cutting corners in training might save you some money in the short term, but improperly trained staff can lead to severe financial repercussions in the future. Finding a quality course for your employees not only keeps them safe but keeps the business safe too. If an accident happens due to lack of training not only do you lose out on the money from the time it takes to investigate the accident, but you have the potential to lose future jobs, get tied up in lawsuits, and go out of business completely.

     

    Credentials


    The credentials of not only the training company, but the instructors too, is an important part of the training process. Some questions to ask when vetting potential training companies include:

    • Who is responsible for creating the curriculum?
    • Who are the instructors?
    • What credentials do the instructors have?
    • What experience do they have?

    It’s also always good to check with your colleagues and peer groups to see if any of them have attended a training session and what their experience was. Proper training saves lives and ensuring that the instructor is qualified can make all the difference.

    If you’ve got questions about training sessions, or anything training related, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of online and in-person training courses.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

     

    Safety LMS Online Courses: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

     

    Get Social


    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

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  3. 3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Tool Tether Pack

    3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Pack

    The ISEA/ANSI 121 Dropped Objects Prevention Standard outlines the safety standards and requirements for testing at-height tool tethering equipment in order to increase safety. This doesn't mean that there will be a requirement for tethering. However, in the future, it may be standardized across different industries.

    3M has developed a wide range of excellent tools for drop prevention and we helped select a wide variety to showcase in the 3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Pack. Buy a Tower Climbing Kit and receive the 3M Fall Protection Sample Pack for FREE for a limited time. The sample kit includes 9 pieces of awesome gear from 3M.

    This kit includes:

    Watch our video outlining the kit and scroll further for descriptions of different drop prevention issues and solutions.

    The Full Video:


    Check out 3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Pack here ↓

     

    Tool Tethers


    Tool tethers have been around for quite a few years. However, traditionally they were referred to as tool lanyards. The industry has adopted the name tool tethers to prevent confusion between tool drop prevention equipment and shock absorbing lanyards. Tool tethers, like most equipment in the at-height industry, come in a range of shapes and sizes.

    How They Work


    Dropped objects are still a huge cause of injury and death in the United States. Tool tethers are designed to help prevent those casualties and also prevent lost productivity and damaged equipment.

    Tool tethers have a range of connections points and a variety of different weight capacities ranging from 1 to 15 pounds. The weight capacity is based on the weight of the tool.

    If you need a tool tether with a larger capacity click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Connecting the tool tether to the tool itself can be done in a few different ways. If the tool has a tether connection built-in, then you are good to go. Simply attach the connection point of the tether to the tool and you’re in business. If you find yourself in a situation where the tool does not have a tether point, there are solutions available. Some options include:

    Self-Adhering Tape – This is a tape that has been designed to adhere to a connection point to your tool.

    Tool Collars – These are components that help retrofit a range of tools with a connection point without hindering the ability to use the handle of the tool.

    Tool tethers come in a range of lengths that not only provide easier use when working but also provide added force reduction in the event of a drop. Another option, if you need to be able to adjust the length, is to use a retractable tether. Think of retractable tethers as mini SRLs for your tools. It functions in much the same way.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Looking for more information about tool tethers? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of Tool Tethers
    Click here to see our full selection of Tools

    Gear Up with Gear Experts Podcast Episode 9 - Tool Tethering

    → Click Here to listen to our Gear Experts discuss tool tethering:

    The Full Video:


    Check out 3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Pack here ↓

     

    Get Social


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  4. Product Spotlight: Petzl GRILLON PLUS Adjustable Positioning Lanyard

    Petzl Grillon

    Positioning yourself where you need to be will make the job a little bit easier when working at height. Beyond that, having the ability to adjust your positioning on the fly – while still maintaining 100% tie-off increases productivity while still maintaining safety standards. Adjustable positioning can be done with the use of specialty equipment and this week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the Petzl GRILLON PLUS Adjustable Positioning Lanyard.

    The Petzl GRILLON PLUS


     

    The GRILLON PLUS is similar to the traditional GRILLON. One of the major differences that you might notice is that the PLUS doesn’t have an abrasion sleeve. That’s because, instead of having a standard kernmantle rope construction, it’s made out of heavy-duty aramid fiber kernmantle rope. Aramid fiber rope provides superior resistance to abrasion when compared to nearly any rope which removes the need for the abrasion sleeve.

    Features


     

    Rope

    Not only is the rope stronger, thanks to the aramid fiber construction, but it also features sewn terminations at both ends. The ends are then covered in a plastic sheath to help keep the connector in position while simultaneously protecting the ends of the rope from abrasion.

    Adjustability

    The adjustability of the GRILLON PLUS is all thanks to the aluminum device that comes attached to the rope. This device is well known for its smoothness when allowing a rope to pass through it.

    Versatility


     

    The GRILLON PLUS is a versatile piece of equipment. It comes in two different lengths – 2 and 3-meter versions. And, if the rope ever needs to be replaced due to damage or any other reason, you can easily swap it out with a GRILLON PLUS Replacement Lanyard. Lastly, it can also be used in two different configurations (or, as we call them, modes). Those modes are double and single mode.

    Single Mode

    Single Mode is used when an anchor is directly above you. This mode will comfortably distribute the load between the belt and the leg loops. Your position can be adjusted by operating the handle while holding the free end of the lanyard.

    Double Mode

    When using the device in double mode, the lanyard is fed through the anchor or structure and the end is secured to one of your hip D-rings while the device is attached to your other D-ring. The double mode technique does a better job at distributing the load to the belt while allowing you to pivot and swing to achieve your desired position.

    Certifications


     

    This lanyard is fancy – no doubt about it. Between the top-of-the-line features and versatility, it’s a device that can come in handy for anyone who needs the ability to position while working at-height. But, perhaps the most important feature is the standards this device meets. It meets ANSI Z359.3, CSA Z259.11, CE EN 385, and CE EN 12841 Type C.

    If you’ve got any questions about the Petzl GRILLON PLUS Adjustable Positioning Lanyard, or anything else related to at-height, industry, and construction, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see the Petzl GRILLON PLUS

    Click here to see our full selection of Petzl gear

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Petzl GRILLON PLUS Adjustable Positioning Lanyard: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  5. The Hierarchy of Fall Protection 101

    We talk about safety a lot and that’s because safety is what we do. Staying safe while on the job not only ensures that you can go home to your family and friends every night, but that you can stay productive. It's OSHA Stand-Down Week 2019 and this week our Gear Experts® are going to give a broad overview of OSHA Stand-Down and break down the Hierarchy of Fall Protection.

    OSHA Stand-Down Week


     

    Every year OSHA has a Stand-Down Week that is observed in the interest of preventing falls in any at-height industry where falling is a hazard while on the job. OSHA encourages employers to have a “Safety Stand-Down” where employers talk directly to employees about safety. Employers should take this break to focus on fall hazards and reinforce the importance of fall prevention. OSHA and NIOSH have provided a ton of resources that employers can utilize when participating in OSHA Stand-Down Week. You can find those resources by clicking here.

    How to Conduct a Safety Stand-Down


     

    Conducting a Safety Stand-Down can be done in many ways and can tie into safety discussions that companies are already having. Some Stand-Down ideas include a toolbox talk, equipment inspections, rescue plan development, and job hazard overviews. If you’re not sure what to talk about, our blog, YouTube channel, and knowledge base are full of valuable resources to spark discussions.

    The Hierarchy of Fall Protection


     

    The main goal of OSHA Stand-Down Week is fall prevention, so we wanted to take this opportunity to discuss the hierarchy of fall protection. The hierarchy of fall protection is a method of categorizing fall protection into 5 stages. The stages go from “No Risk” (Stage 1) to “High Risk” (Stage 5). Those stages are:

    1. Hazard Elimination;
    2. Fall Prevention;
    3. Fall Restraint;
    4. Fall Arrest; and
    5. Safety Monitor.

    The Break Down


     

    So, now that we’ve covered the stages of fall protection, let’s dive a bit deeper into each stage and what they actually mean.

    Hazard Elimination (Stage 1)

    Hazard elimination is the act of completely removing a hazard via construction or maintenance. Basically, it means that the risk of falling has been completely prevented. For example, fixing a hole in the outer wall of a building is hazard elimination. Once the hole has been fixed, no one can fall out of the building.

    Fall Prevention (Stage 2)

    Fall prevention is the use of equipment that has the purpose of completely preventing access to a fall hazard. While the fall hazard has not been “removed” by means of construction or maintenance (stage 1), it has been blocked with equipment that has been designed for that purpose. Guardrails are an example of fall prevention.

    Fall Restraint (Stage 3)

    Fall restraint is a system that prevents a person working at-height from falling. This is done by using specialty equipment, like a lanyard, to connect a worker to an anchor that prevents the worker from reaching an area where the risk of a fall exists.

    Fall Arrest (Stage 4)

    Fall arrest is a form of fall protection in which a piece of specialty equipment stops the descent of a person who is falling. An example of this would be a self-retracting lifeline.

    Safety Monitor (Stage 5)

    Safety monitor is the highest risk stage in the Hierarchy of Fall Protection. This method is used in situations where it is proven that all other types of fall protection are not possible or would increase the potential danger. A competent and trained person is assigned to monitor the work of others in this situation.

    Clearly, stage 5 of the Hierarchy of Fall Protection is the most dangerous and least preferred method. If you have any questions about the Hierarchy of Fall Protection or the equipment required at the different stages, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    The ABCs of Fall Protection


    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  6. Product Spotlight: Petzl I'D

    When it comes to safely lowering yourself down a rope, a descender is one of the most valuable tools in your arsenal. But, as with most things in this world, there are a ton of different choices and knowing which one will best fit your applications can be difficult. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the Petzl I’D Self-Breaking Rope Descender.

    Designed for Ease of Use


     

    The Petzl I’D has been expertly designed by Petzl for ease of use. With very little effort you can lower a load safely to the ground in a smooth, controlled fashion. This can make situations, like rescues, where a rough descent could cause potential dangers easier for everyone involved. Not to mention it can make part of the everyday job easier, too.

    Features


     

    The Petzl I’D has been jam-packed with valuable features including anti-panic, anti-error, locking mechanisms, and a multi-function handle.

    Anti-Panic

    The anti-panic function helps ensure that if the operator starts to descend too fast, they won’t lose control. Essentially if the operator pulls the handle too hard the brakes kick in and automatically stop the descent.

    Anti-Error

    Unfortunately, sometimes certain situations (like rescues) can cause high stress which can lead to equipment being rigged incorrectly. With the anti-error function of the Petzl I’D you don’t have to worry about costly mistakes being made during high-stress situations. The Petzl I’D has been designed with an anti-error function that renders the device useless unless the rope has been inserted the correct way. While the anti-error function can reduce the risk of accidents caused by high-stress situations, it is highly recommended that each member of your crew obtains training on both the equipment being used and the possible situations they will encounter while on the job.

    Locked

    The Petzl I’D features a moving side plate – which is how the rope is inserted into the device. Petzl has also designed a way to lock the side plate with a screw. This allows the devices to be integrated into evacuation kits.

    Multi-Function

    With ease of use in mind, the Petzl I’D features a multi-function handle that unlocks the rope and controls the descent with one hand. This one hand control allows the user to always keep a free hand on the end of the rope for added control and security.

    Sizes & Specs


     

    The Petzl I’D comes in two different sizes: the Petzl I’D D200S0 Small Self-Breaking Rope Descender and the Petzl I’D D200L0 Large Self-Breaking Rope Descender. Both descenders have been tested and certified to meet EN 341 Class A, CE EN 12841 type C, ANSI Z359.4, NFPA 1983 Technical Use, and EAC.

    The small Petzl I’D (D200S0) is for ropes between 10mm (.39”) and 11.5mm (.45”) in diameter. The large Petzl I’D (D200L0) is intended for ropes between 11.5mm (.45”) and 13mm (.51”) in diameter.

    Click here to see our selection of Petzl I’D Self-Breaking Rope Descenders

    Click here to see our selection of Petzl Gear

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Petzl I’D: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  7. Product Spotlight: Tuf-Tug Cable Climb Systems

    Cable climb systems, also known as a ladder fall protection system, can streamline tower maintenance projects and provide additional job site safety. The basic function of a cable climb system is to have a ladder with a cable attached to it, pre-installed on a tower. You use a cable grab, attached to your sternal D-ring, to easily move up and down the ladder. In the event of a fall, the cable safety sleeve locks onto the cable and arrests the fall. Applications for cable climb systems include towers, billboards, commercial buildings, utility structures, solar, and wind. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down Tuf-Tug cable climb systems.

    Approved


     

    As legacy cable climb systems on towers begin to reach the end of their useful life, and as structures that are updated are required to have cable climb systems installed, it can start to be difficult to know which systems are approved to be used on specific sites. Tuf-Tug Cable Climb Systems are approved for installation on major tower sites by their owners. This makes deciding which system to get a whole lot easier.

    What Systems?


     

    Tuf-Tug makes cable climb systems for all standard towers in most standard lengths. On top of that, they also feature all of the needed equipment for the system included with the system itself – say goodbye to having to buy extra parts!

    Tuf-Tug manufactures 3 systems. They are a monopole system, a fixed ladder system, and a round climbing leg system.

    What’s Included?


     

    All systems include A stainless steel (factory swaged) cable that is cut to the chosen length. The stainless steel finish provides additional protection against harsh weather conditions which extends the life of the system.

    Monopole

    The monopole system includes:

    • A cable head assembly with fasteners and impact attenuator;
    • Monopole cable guides;
    • A monopole base anchor bracket with a tension adjustment anchor bolt;
    • Cable clips; and
    • Cable fasteners.

    This system is available in 100’, 150’, 200’, and 250’ lengths.

    Fixed Ladder

    The fixed ladder system includes:

    • A heavy-duty upright mount bracket for solid rung ladders;
    • Ladder mount cable guides;
    • A head assembly with an impact attenuator;
    • Base anchor bracket assembly with tension adjustment;
    • Eye bolts; and
    • Cable clips;

    This system is available in 100’, 200’, 250’, 300’, and 400’ lengths.

    Round Climbing Leg

    The round climbing leg system includes:

    • A universal round leg head adapter bracket (which fits legs between 1.5 and 5 inches in diameter);
    • A round leg universal channel clamp (for up to 8 inches in diameter);
    • A head assembly with an impact attenuator;
    • Stud mount cable guides with fasteners;
    • A base anchor angle attachment bracket with tension adjustment eyebolt;
    • Thimble; and
    • Cable clamps.

    This system is available in 150’, 200’, 250’, and 300’ lengths.

    Further Customization


     

    If you need additional components or even a non-standard length, these cable climb systems can be completely customized to fit your requirements. For more information on customization, or for any other questions, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of Tuf-Tug Cable Climb Systems

    Click here to see our full selection of Tug-Tug Equipment

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any fall protection equipment is used.

    Cable Climb Systems: The Playlist


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

    iTunes | Spotify | Google Play Music

     

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  8. Harness Inspection 101

    Whether you are in telecom, wind, solar, or tree care, construction, or any other at-height industry, the harness you wear is one of the most important pieces of equipment in your arsenal. Your harness is the apex of all your equipment. It is where everything converges, and where the perfect harmony of fall protection meets to ensure your safety on the job site. This week, our Gear Experts® are going to discuss how to properly inspect a harness.

    Harness Inspection


     

    There’s an old saying that states that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. That saying goes far beyond chains – and in the context of this blog post, it is also true for fall protection. As we said in the opening of this post, your harness is an integral part of your fall protection setup. But no harness will last forever, and sometimes unforeseen events can cause the harness to need to be replaced. That’s where harness inspection comes in.

    Harness inspection is a pretty simple concept – it is the act of reviewing your harness before climbing to ensure that the harness will remain functioning both while you climb and in the event of a fall. The actual act of inspecting the harness can have some mild variance depending on the construction of the harness. The main things to consider are what type of buckle system (pass through, tongue buckle, or quick connect) the harness has and whether it has a waist belt or not.

    Before you start your inspection, we highly recommend having a harness inspection form. A harness inspection form will help you keep records of when you inspected the harness as well as information like the serial number, date of first use, who inspected it, and any other notes about the inspection. We have a free downloadable harness inspection for in our Knowledge Base. Click here for your free copy of the form.

    What to Inspect


     

    Once you start the inspection, what exactly should you inspect?

    Labels & Markings

    The first thing to inspect is the labels and markings. Are all the labels intact? Do you have all the appropriate ANSI, OSHA, & CSA markings required? What is the date of first use? Has an impact indicator (sign of deployment) been triggered?

    Hardware

    Next, we want to start looking at the harness hardware. What condition are the shoulder adjustment buckles in? What about the leg and waist buckles? What about the other hardware the harness features? The D-rings should be closely inspected as well (the dorsal, side, shoulder, and/or sternal). Lastly, is any of the hardware corroded, pitting, or nicked?

    Webbing & Stitching

    The final piece of the puzzle is to inspect the webbing and stitching. What condition are the shoulder, chest, leg, and back straps in? Does the harness have any cuts, burns, or holes? Is there any paint contamination? What about excessive wear, heat corrosion, or UV damage? How is the stitching and is it affected by any of the above checks?

    Retiring a Harness


     

    The purpose of inspecting a harness is to make sure that the harness can handle the job it was meant to do. If the harness fails inspection that means it is not in compliance with ANSI requirements and should be retired and replaced immediately.

    If you’ve got questions about harness inspection, or if your harness has failed inspection and you’re looking for something new, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to download your free harness inspection form from our Knowledge Base

    Click here to access our full selection of inspection forms

    Click here to see our full selection of fall protection harnesses

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any Fall Protection Equipment is used.

    Fall Protection Harnesses: The Playlist


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  9. Fall Protection Rescue Kit Buying Guide

    It’s no secret that climbing towers for a living is a dangerous job. While we would all like to believe that accidents don’t happen, we know they do. Being prepared for emergency situations is not only important but also required by law. Finding and sourcing all the equipment needed for your rescue “kit” can take up too much of your time. Here at GME Supply, we know your time is valuable. That’s why we carry a full selection of pre-assembled rescue kits. In this blog post, our Gear Experts® are going to go over what things you need to look for in a rescue kit.

    Rescue Kits


     

    Rescue kits are fantastic because they include everything you need to perform a rescue. One important thing to point out is that not every rescue kit is going to be right for every rescue. Beyond that, there may be special circumstances that require additional equipment or highly specialized kits. We will cover that in more detail later. For now, let’s focus on standard rescue kits.

    What’s Included


     

    Most rescue kits are going to come with a standard set of equipment. However, it is important that you check and make sure the kit has the equipment you need and that it meets your specifications. The standard items that will come in nearly every kit are a rope, a rope bag, a descender, carabiners, a pick-off strap (or haul system), and a sling.

    What to Look For


     

    What you need in your kit will be dependent on the situations you encounter the most. No two rescues are the same and that makes a kit that can cover every situation impossible to build. But, with a little help from our Gear Experts® we can have you in compliance and ready to go with a safety plan.

    When looking for rescue kits there are many things to consider. Let’s break down some of the key points that you need to consider before you purchase.

    Rope: When looking at the rope (lifeline) that the kit comes with some key things to look at are rope diameter, length, and color. For more about how to find the perfect rope, click here to check out our blog post all about rope.

    Rope Bag: Your rope bag helps you transport and protect your rope. Some things to consider about the rope bag are material, weather resistance, size, and color. We've got a blog post that covers rope bags, too. Click here to check it out!

    Descender: A descender is a convenient and intricate part of any rescue system. Some things to look for are features like anti-panic, rope compatibility, weight, and certifications.

    Carabiners: Carabiners are a versatile tool and have a range of functions. Things to look for in your rescue kit carabiners are gate style, size, certifications, and load ratings.

    Pick-Off Strap: Pick-off straps help you transfer a load during rescue situations. The most important things to consider for a pick-off strap is adjustable length and MBS.

    Haul System: A haul system can help prevent difficulties when performing a rescue. And when someone’s life is on the line ease of use can make all the difference. Some things to consider when looking at a haul system include ease of use, mechanical advantage, and details about the equipment utilized in the system.

    Specialty and Custom Rescue Kits


     

    Sometimes the jobs you perform are uncommon and require a specialty kit. We feature a selection of different rescue kits that are specialized for certain situations like self-rescues, wind rescue, and crane tech rescues.  If you have a specific type of kit that you need built – we’ve got you covered there too.

    Our state of the art account management system allows us to create custom kits, built specifically to suit your needs. The benefit of this type of system is that next time you call in; you have the same pricing and the same products every time. You don’t have to go through countless emails and talk to 5 different people to make sure that you are getting the exact same kit you got last time because we do that for you.

    Would you like to build your custom kit, looking to get some advice on which kit is best for your situation, or simply have questions? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any fall protection equipment is used.

    Click here to see our full selection of Fall Protection Rescue Kits

    Fall Protection Rescue Kits: Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated
    to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® will be coming to your ears in early 2019 and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show, and sign up to get alerted when our first episode drops, head on over to gearexperts.com. There's a trailer there too, so you can get a sneak peek of the show.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  10. ANSI Standard for Descent Devices

    Few devices in your gear bag are as versatile as your descender. Whether you need to descend quickly, slowly over time, or perform a rescue, this device can do it all and keep you safe in the process. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the ANSI Standards for descent devices.

    ANSI Z359.4-2013


     

    ANSI Z359.4-2013 outlines the safety requirements for assisted-rescue and self-rescue systems, subsystems and components. I know what you’re thinking: that title doesn’t say anything about descent devices. But, in the scope of the standard, it does mention descent control devices. An important clarification for you to know is that this standard is for rescue, not work positioning. We will cover more about that later.

    Section 3.2.7: Descent Devices


     

    The ANSI Z359.4-2013 standard is further broken down by sections. Section 3.2.7 specifically covers descent devices and is broken down into additional subsections for additional clarification.

    Section 3.2.7.1

    Section 3.2.7.1 covers descent energy and capacity for both single-use and multiple use devices.

    Section 3.2.7.2

    This section looks at descent speed – setting requirements for the maximum distance that you can lower yourself. For devices like the Petzl I’D Small Self-Braking Rope Descender or WestFall Pro D4 Descender for 7/16” Rope the maximum descent speed is 6.6 feet per second.

    Section 3.2.7.3

    This section covers static strength. Static strength is defined as a singular force being put on the device. Think of this a constant rate of force – similar to holding and maintaining a load.

    Section 3.2.7.4

    Section 3.2.7.4 covers dynamic strength. Dynamic strength is defined as a peak force being put on the device. Think of this as a sudden shock of force – similar to the force that is exerted in the event of a fall.

    Section 3.2.7.5

    This final section covers the general function of the device. This is where features like anti-panic come into play. If excessive force is applied or if you let go of the device completely, the device should halt the descent within 6 inches.

    Work Positioning


     

    Earlier we mentioned that the ANSI Z359.4-2013 standard is for rescue and not work positioning. In fact, at the time of this writing, there is no ANSI Standard that covers the use of descent devices for work positioning. This doesn’t make them unsafe or mean they are not suitable for work positioning. It just means that no official standard has been released for specifications and requirements. Devices like the Petzl I’D or WestFall Pro D4 are great devices for descending down to work in suspension in a range of situations like on a tower, painting, or cleaning windows. Of course, you still need to have proper fall arrest in place like a rope grab on a backup lifeline or an SRL.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any fall protection equipment is used.

    Not sure which descender is right for you or have questions about the ANSI Z359.4-2013 Standard? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see the Petzl I’D Small Self-Braking Rope Descender

    Click here to see the WestFall Pro D4 Descender

    Click here to see our full selection of Descenders

    ANSI Standard for Descent Devices: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts®: The Podcast


    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated
    to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® will be coming to your ears in early 2019 and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show, and sign up to get alerted when our first episode drops, head on over to gearexperts.com. There's a trailer there too, so you can get a sneak peek of the show.

    Get social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

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