ANSI

  1. Tenacious Work Gear from Ergodyne

    Ergodyne Be Seen Stay Safe

    Ergodyne has been developing products to make the workplace better since 1983. This week we highlight our growing selection of newer tools and PPE from Ergodyne offered here at GME Supply including tool tethers, safety glasses, gloves, and more. 

     

    Tool Tethers


    The ISEA/ANSI 121 Dropped Objects Prevention Standard outlines the safety standards and requirements for testing at-height tool tethering equipment in order to increase safety. While there are not currently any OSHA requirements specific to general or construction industries, many contractors and employers have begun implementing mandates within their companies or job sites for required 100% tie-off for all drop hazards.

    Tool tethers have been around for quite a few years. However, traditionally they were referred to as tool lanyards. The industry has adopted the name tool tethers to prevent confusion between tool drop prevention equipment and shock-absorbing lanyards. Tool tethers, like most equipment in the at-height industry, come in a range of shapes and sizes.

    We offer a huge selection of Ergodyne Tool Tether solutions for many tool types and sizes. If you need a tool tether with a larger capacity click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.



    Ergodyne Glasses


    When it comes to compliance, Ergodyne goes above and beyond with their Skullerz® Safety Glasses. That way, every time you wear Skullerz® Safety Glasses you can be sure of some important aspects: 

    First, Skullerz® Safety Glasses are third-party tested for ANSI Z87.1+ High Velocity Impact protection and optical performance and also third-party tested for MIL-PRF-32432 Ballistic Impact Fragmentation - Class 1. Other safety glasses aren't tested for compliance at those levels and often don’t hold up under the same scrutiny.

    Every pair of Skullerz® Safety Glasses also feature anti-scratch lenses with 99.9% UVA, UVB, and UVC protection. You get a number of frame patterns to suit your style and 

     

    Ergodyne Gloves


    Ergodyne stands out in quality, design, and style with everything they manufacture and their gloves are no exception. And, as the temperature starts to drop this season, Ergodyne’s thermal hand protection can keep your hands safe from work hazards and the frigid weather. 

    It’s important to choose a glove that can provide wind and water-resistance alongside your typical search for performance measures like impact, puncture, and tear resistance. We have quite a few different styles of thermal gloves from Ergodyne that will meet your comfort performance needs and make working in the cold more bearable.

     

    Ergodyne Video:


    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. The manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Looking for more information about tool tethers? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of Tool Tethers

    Click here to see our full selection of Tools

    Gear Up with Gear Experts Podcast Episode 9 - Tool Tethering

    Click Here to listen to our Gear Experts discuss tool tethering:

     

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  2. Kask Helmets: Zenith vs. Super Plasma HD

    Kask Plasma and Zenith Helmets

    Hazards are everywhere on the job site and protecting your noggin from falling objects, or from getting bumped and bruised while walking and climbing is an intricate part of job site safety. This week our Gear Experts® are going to compare two premium helmets from our friends over at Kask.

    Similarities


    The two helmets we are going to compare are the Kask Zenith Helmet and the Kask Super Plasma HD. Both of these helmets are extremely popular and for good reason. They both set the bar in comfort and protection for at-height workers. We are going to start this comparison with some things the helmets have in common.

     

    Features


    The outer shells are constructed of a high strength ABS plastic that provides excellent protection from falls or impacts. Underneath the outer shell is an HD polystyrene internal shell that increases impact protection. Both of these helmets feature universal adjustable suspension systems that utilize a simple adjustment wheel to attain a precise fit. The comfort doesn’t stop there, though. They also feature a soft eco-leather chin strap that is machine washable and prevents uncomfortable irritation of the skin. Last, but not least, both helmets can be purchased in 6 different color options – allowing you to express yourself while still maintaining excellent protection. Those colors are black, blue, red, white, yellow, and orange.

     

    Differences


    Now it’s time to discuss the differences. Both helmets have a range of features that promote comfortability while maintaining a secure fit. But, depending on the requirements of your job site, and compatibility with accessories, you may find yourself choosing one helmet over the other.

     

    Kask Super Plasma HD

    This helmet is perfect for tower climbers and rope access professionals because of its 10-vent air intake system. This system provides enhanced breathability and each intake features anti-intrusion grills to prevent dust and debris from entering the helmet. The headband is made of a fast-drying fabric that pulls moisture away from your skin and disperses it to the outside of the band for quicker evaporation. In fact, the super plasma HD is so comfortable, that the general construction industry is adopting it as a more comfortable and safer alternative to traditional hard hats – this is in large part to the chin strap that prevents the helmet from falling off.

    This helmet is compatible with all of Kask’s visors, earmuffs, and accessories. Keep in mind that some visors and other accessories may require an adapter to properly and safely attach the equipment to the helmet. The Kask Super Plasma HD is a Type 1 Class C helmet which means it meets all of the necessary ANSI and CSA standards for head protection. We covered ANSI helmet classes in more detail in our Safety Helmets 101 blog post. You can also find a free downloadable Safety Helmets 101 poster by visiting our Knowledge Base.

    Kask Zenith Helmet

    If you compare the Kask Zenith side by side to the Kask Super Plasma HD, you’ll immediately notice one big difference – the Zenith is lacking any vents. That helps this helmet achieve it’s Type 1 Class E rating meaning that it is electric shock protected. This helmet is also compatible with Kask Ear Muffs but, it is only compatible with Kask’s Zen line of accessories. Kask does have a wide variety of Zen accessories, though, so you finding the accessories you need shouldn’t be a problem.

    The biggest difference between these two helmets is the type and class rating. Not only is that the biggest difference, but it is also the most important difference.

    Click here to see the Kask Zenith Helmet

    Click here to see the Kask Super Plasma HD Helmet

    Click here to see the Zen line of visors and accessories

    Click here to see our full lineup of Kask accessories

    Click here to check out our Safety 101 blog post

    Click here to download your free copy of our Safety 101 poster

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Zenith vs. Super Plasma HD: The Video


     

     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

     

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  3. Product Spotlight: Arbor Ropes from Sterling Rope

    Sterling Rope Tree Care

     

    Working in the tree care industry, like most at-height industries, requires a set of special equipment to keep you safe and get the job done right. One key piece of equipment rope. The week our Gear Experts® are going to break down some Sterling ropes specifically designed for our arborist friends in the tree care industry.

    Atlas Rig Line

    When you’re removing large trunk sections of a tree you need to know that your rigging system can handle and absorb large dynamic forces. Sterling has been designing ropes to handle large kinetic forces for over 20 years and they designed their Atlas Rig Line specifically for this purpose.

    Features

    The Atlas Rig Line is ideal for removing tree trunk sections, is available in blue and white, and comes in 150, 200, or 600-foot lengths. It is a 9/16” rope with a polyester sheath and nylon core. And, it offers a soft hand, easy knotability, and is designed to be used in a rope friction device, capstan hoist, or pulley.

    Specifications

    The specifications of this rope just go to prove that it means business. With a minimum breaking strength of 11,050 pounds and an average breaking strength of 13,750 pounds – this rope can handle nearly any job. And, it meets ANSI Z133.1 requirements.

    Scion Climbing Line

    Next, we are going to cover the Scion Climbing Line from Sterling. This rope was developed with climbing in mind. It has a very durable construction and has been designed to absorb large dynamic forces.

    Features

    The Scion Climbing Line is ideal for both Doubled Rope Technique (DdRT) and Single Rope Technique (SRT). It is an 11.5 mm rope with a 24-strand polyester cover. The double braided construction provides decreased elongation, easy hand, and great knotability. The tight, durable sheath allows the rope to handle mechanical devices and hardware well and sewn termination ends are available in all length and color options.

    Specifications

    Speaking of length and color options - this rope is available in orange, blue, and green. And, it comes in 150, 200, and 600-foot lengths. For standards, it meets both EN 1891 type A and ANSI Z133 requirements so you know this rope is up to the challenge.

    Click here to see the Sterling Rope Atlas Rig Line

    Click here to see the Sterling Rope Scion Climbing Line

    Click here to see our full selection of Sterling Rope Products

    Click here to see our full selection of tree care products

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Sterling Rope Arbor Ropes: The Video


    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

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    We’re Also on Snapchat

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  4. 3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Tool Tether Pack

    3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Pack

    The ISEA/ANSI 121 Dropped Objects Prevention Standard outlines the safety standards and requirements for testing at-height tool tethering equipment in order to increase safety. This doesn't mean that there will be a requirement for tethering. However, in the future, it may be standardized across different industries.

    3M has developed a wide range of excellent tools for drop prevention and we helped select a wide variety to showcase in the 3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Pack. Buy a Tower Climbing Kit and receive the 3M Fall Protection Sample Pack for FREE for a limited time. The sample kit includes 9 pieces of awesome gear from 3M.

    This kit includes:

    Watch our video outlining the kit and scroll further for descriptions of different drop prevention issues and solutions.

    The Full Video:


    Check out 3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Pack here ↓

     

    Tool Tethers


    Tool tethers have been around for quite a few years. However, traditionally they were referred to as tool lanyards. The industry has adopted the name tool tethers to prevent confusion between tool drop prevention equipment and shock absorbing lanyards. Tool tethers, like most equipment in the at-height industry, come in a range of shapes and sizes.

    How They Work


    Dropped objects are still a huge cause of injury and death in the United States. Tool tethers are designed to help prevent those casualties and also prevent lost productivity and damaged equipment.

    Tool tethers have a range of connections points and a variety of different weight capacities ranging from 1 to 15 pounds. The weight capacity is based on the weight of the tool.

    If you need a tool tether with a larger capacity click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Connecting the tool tether to the tool itself can be done in a few different ways. If the tool has a tether connection built-in, then you are good to go. Simply attach the connection point of the tether to the tool and you’re in business. If you find yourself in a situation where the tool does not have a tether point, there are solutions available. Some options include:

    Self-Adhering Tape – This is a tape that has been designed to adhere to a connection point to your tool.

    Tool Collars – These are components that help retrofit a range of tools with a connection point without hindering the ability to use the handle of the tool.

    Tool tethers come in a range of lengths that not only provide easier use when working but also provide added force reduction in the event of a drop. Another option, if you need to be able to adjust the length, is to use a retractable tether. Think of retractable tethers as mini SRLs for your tools. It functions in much the same way.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Looking for more information about tool tethers? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of Tool Tethers
    Click here to see our full selection of Tools

    Gear Up with Gear Experts Podcast Episode 9 - Tool Tethering

    → Click Here to listen to our Gear Experts discuss tool tethering:

    The Full Video:


    Check out 3M Fall Protection for Tools Sample Pack here ↓

     

    Get Social


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  5. Anti-Vibration 101

    When it comes to working in at-height, industry, and construction there is no shortage of dangers. From the risk of falling, heat stress, and cold stress, to dropped tools and deadly gasses, the job site is a minefield of potential hazards. One lesser-known (or at least less frequently talked about) are the dangers of vibrations. This week our Gear Experts® are going to discuss the dangers of vibrations and how the use of Anti-Vibration Gloves can help protect you.

    Bad Vibrations


     

    When the Beach Boys wrote Good Vibrations, they definitely weren’t talking about the kind created by power tools. Using power tools is common on the job site and hard to avoid. Power tools are great – they make extremely difficult tasks easier and save valuable time by making quick work of tasks that would take a lot longer by hand. But, the battery or plug powered devices are pumping out a lot of power and in turn, create a lot of vibrations when in use. Overexposure to those bad vibrations can lead to Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS).

    Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS)


     

    HAVS is diagnosed in three main components.

    Peripheral Neuropathy of the Hands

    This component can cause a loss of dexterity, tingling, and numbness.

    Secondary Raynaud’s

    This component is sometimes referred to as vibration white finger (VWF) and has been described the BC Medical Journal as the most dramatic manifestation of HAVS. Secondary Raynaud’s produces intermittent whitening of the fingers. It typically starts at the tips of the fingers and will travel up your fingers as the disease progresses. You may also experience tingling, pricking, chilling, burning, or a numbing sensation.

    Musculoskeletal Issues

    This is the broadest and least defined of the three HAVS components. Symptoms of musculoskeletal issues include weakness, pain of the hands, wrists, forearms, and elbows, and discomfort.

    Preventing HAVS


     

    HAVS is a serious condition and has been around for decades, but preventative measures can be taken to reduce the effects of vibrations on your hands and arms. Anti-Vibration Gloves have been specifically designed to help prevent the vibrations made from power tools and heavy machinery from making it to your body. But, as with all equipment, knowing the right ones to use is important.

    ANSI S2.73 // ISO 10819


     

    The ANSI S2.73 standard for anti-vibration gloves outlines testing requirements and certifies that the gloves meet or exceed the requirements.

    This standard requires that the gloves meet the following specifications:

    • Must have a full finger design;
    • Must reduce “medium range frequencies” (also referred to as TM) by at least 10% compared to a bare hand;
    • Must reduce “high range frequencies” (also referred to as TH) by at least 40% compared to a bare hand;
    • Must have padding no more than 8mm thick in the palm;
    • Must have at least 50% more padding in the fingers and thumb; and
    • Must not have any break between the palm pad base and fingertips.

    For more information on anti-vibration gloves, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Click here to see our selection of anti-vibration gloves.

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  6. Product Spotlight: 3M SecureFit Safety Helmet

    Protecting your skull is an important part of job site safety. After all, without your head – it’s kind of hard to do anything. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the all-new 3M SecureFit X5000 Series ANSI Safety Helmet.

    The Features


     

    Let’s start with the basics of this helmet. Like most standard helmets it features suspension and adjustment options. But 3M has taken these basic features a step further to create a quality helmet that breaks the status quo.

    Suspension

    This helmet features 3M Pressure Diffusion technology in the suspension to increase both comfort and security. In fact, the Pressure Diffusion reduces the force on your forehead by up to 20% when compared to older styles of 3M helmet suspension. The suspension also has been designed to sit lower on the head to further reduce the pressure and increase both comfort and security.

    Adjustments

    What good is a helmet that has comfortable suspension if the helmet doesn’t fit on your head you ask? Well, with 15 different adjustment settings that allow for a range of different height and front-to-back settings, you won’t have to worry about that anymore. Plus, the smooth, turning ratchet suspension system makes the headband adjustments quick and easy.

    Additional Features

    This helmet doesn’t just stop at basic features like suspension and adjustment options. It also includes accessory slots and clips integrated into the helmet that are compatible with a wide variety of 3M accessories. And, it includes a UVicator sensor that is installed on the helmet. The UVicator sensor changes color from red to white over time as it is exposed to UV (ultraviolet) light. Once the color has changed to white it indicates that that the helmet should be retired due to UV exposure.

    Design


     

    You’ll notice as soon as you look at the helmet that it doesn’t look like a traditional safety helmet. That’s because the design is inspired by modern climbing helmets. Who said you can’t be safe while looking cool? And, the brimless design ensures that you have a better awareness of hazards.

    Standards


     

    Now we get to the most important part – standards. After all, you need to know if this helmet is something that you can use on a specific job site. All 3M SecureFit X5000 Series helmets meet ANSI Z89.1-2014 and are Type 1 helmets. We covered helmet standards in more detail in our Safety Helmets 101 blog post. We also have a free Safety Helmets 101 poster that you can download from our Knowledge Base.

    Options


     

    This helmet comes in a wide variety of options. First, you can choose if you want standard or reflective. Then you can choose whether you want a vented or non-vented helmet. The last thing you can choose is color. This helmet is available in a total of 8 colors.

    For more information about the 3M SecureFit X5000 Series ANSI Safety Helmet you can view the product here or click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    3M SecureFit Safety Helmet: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  7. Product Spotlight: Ty-Flot Quick Switch

    Injuries and fatalities resulting from dropped tools are a growing concern in all at-height industries. Many general contractors and tower owners are now requiring tools to be tethered while on the job site. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the Quick Switch from Ty-Flot and how it can make tool tethering easier while on the job.

    Growing Concerns


     

    Before we break down the kit, we want to address some of the concerns about dropped objects. As we mentioned above, many GCs, tower owners, and other companies are requiring tool tethering on job sites. That’s because, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, over 50,000 “struck by falling object” OSHA reports are submitted every year. Not only is the person holding the tool at risk, but the people below, pedestrians outside the job site, equipment, and lost time are all at risk when tool tethering is not used.

    ISEA/ANSI 121 Dropped Objects Prevention Standard


     

    The ISEA/ANSI 121 Dropped Objects Prevention Standard was released in July of 2018 with the mission of setting safety requirements for the testing of at-height tool tethering equipment. While this standard does not require the use of tool tethers, it does ensure that as long as the tethering equipment you purchase has the ISEA/ANSI 121 badge, you can be sure that the tethers can handle the job. For more information about the Dropped Objects Prevention Standard, click here to check out our blog post.

    Ty-Flot Quick Switch


     

    The Ty-Flot Quick Switch is one of the most innovative solutions for 100% tool tie-off. This line of tool tethering equipment will ensure that you can stay safe on the job without sacrificing productivity. It's expert design allows you to retain the freedom to move your hands freely while working at height.

    Dock and Switch


     

    Keeping the ability for you to use your hands freely while still having 100% tool tie-off can be achieved thanks to Ty-Flot’s unique dock and switch system. There is a clip attached to the tool tether. The clip can be attached to the doc on a bolt bag or other Quick Ship attachment point or via the Quick Switch Wrist Straps. When the tether clip is attached to a dock it cannot be removed unless it is attached to another dock (see the video below for more information on how to dock the lanyard correctly).

    Fully Contained


     

    The Ty-Flot Quick Switch system has another unique feature: it’s always contained on your wrist. Unlike other tool tethering systems, the Quick Switch has been designed with mobility in mind. Staying contained on your wrist provides other benefits as well. It greatly reduces the swing motion when a tool is dropped and it makes sharing tools with co-workers much easier – while still maintaining 100% tie-off.

    Features


     

    The short tether reduces the risk of snagging and fatigue which is common in elastic tool tethers that are longer and attached to your belt. This increases the useful life of the tool tether and helps keep your replacement costs down. Don’t let the small size fool you, though, because this tool tether can hold up to 6 pounds. It’s compatible with Ty-Flot’s entire line of tool collars and any other tool collars available on the market.

    Click here to see Ty-Flot Quick Switch Products

    Click here to see our full selection of Ty-Flot tool tethering gear

    Click here to see all of our tool tethering gear

    Click here for more information on the ISEA/ANSI 121 Dropped Objects Prevention Standard

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any equipment is used.

    Ty-Flot Quick Switch: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    If you haven’t already checked out Gear Up with Gear Experts, our podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction, it is available for download! You can find it on all major podcast listening platforms like Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play Music, + your favorite podcatcher of choice. And, you can head on over to gearexperts.com to follow us on social media, check out our detailed show notes, and sign up for updates.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  8. First Aid 101

    While we all would like to live in a world where accidents don’t happen. Unfortunately, that is not the case. Being prepared for accidents can make all the difference in emergency situations. One important aspect of that preparedness is having a first aid kit on site and fully stocked. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down ANSI requirements for first aid kits.

    ANSI Z308.1


     

    The ANSI Z308.1 standard sets the standard for minimum requirements for first aid kits and their contents. Each kit is classified by the assortment and quantity of first aid supplies to treat injuries and illnesses common to workplaces, such as major and minor wounds, minor burns, sprains and strains, and eye injuries. There are two kit classes and 4 classifications depending on the contents and size of the kit.

    ANSI Kit Classes


     

    The kit classes for an ANSI approved first aid kits are broken down into two classes: Class A and Class B.

    Class A

    Class A kits are designed to deal with the most common types of workplace injuries like minor cuts and scrapes, sprains, etc.

    Class B

    Class B kits, on the other hand, are designed with a more varied type and quantity of supplies. They are intended to deal with injuries in more complex or high-risk environments.

    Kit Classifications


     

    Kit classifications further break down kits based on portability, mounting options, resistance to water, and corrosion and impact resistance. These classes are expressed as Type 1, 2, 3, or 4.

    Type 1

    Type 1 kits are intended for use in stationary, indoor applications. They are not portable and should have means to be mounted in a fixed position.

    Type 2

    Type 2 kits are intended for portable, indoor applications. These should be equipped with a carrying handle.

    Type 3

    Type 3 kits are intended for portable use in mobile indoor and outdoor settings. They should have the ability to be mounted and contain a water-resistant seal.

    Type 4

    Type 4 kits are intended for portable use in mobile industries or outdoor applications where the potential for damage due to environmental factors and rough handling is present.

    Supplies


     

    The standard also specifies the minimum amount of supplies to be included with each kit as well as the minimum size or volume of the kit itself. Lastly, the standard specifies that the kits contain first aid supplies in uniform-sized color-coded boxes. Below we feature a chart that outlines these requirements.

    We'd also like to note that unfortunately, some materials in first aid kits do have expirations dates. So, it's important to routinely check your kits for expired materials and replace them as needed. We also recommend that you refill items that have been more than 60% depleted. This will help ensure that you always have the supplies you need when you need them.

    Build vs. Buy


     

    Now you’re probably wondering whether it is better to build your own kit or buy your kit. The answer is both. Building your own kit may be something that you want or feel you need to do. Not every job site is the same, so you may want a custom kit that has supplies in addition to the ones that come in standard kits. The important thing to remember is that you include everything required by the ANSI Z308.1 standard.

    If you don’t want to build your own kit, we’ve got a full selection of pre-built ANSI complaint kits. They come in every shape, size, and classification so you can be in compliance no matter what the job site situation is. You can still add further customization to these kits by adding additional job site specific items. The kit includes everything that is required with extra space for everything that you need.

    Free Poster


     

    We’ve made this blog post into a free downloadable poster available in our Knowledge Base. Click here to download the poster. And, if you have any questions about first aid or which kit you need on the job site, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of first aid kits

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any PPE is used.

    First Aid: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

    iTunes | Spotify | Google Play Music

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  9. Harness Inspection 101

    Whether you are in telecom, wind, solar, or tree care, construction, or any other at-height industry, the harness you wear is one of the most important pieces of equipment in your arsenal. Your harness is the apex of all your equipment. It is where everything converges, and where the perfect harmony of fall protection meets to ensure your safety on the job site. This week, our Gear Experts® are going to discuss how to properly inspect a harness.

    Harness Inspection


     

    There’s an old saying that states that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. That saying goes far beyond chains – and in the context of this blog post, it is also true for fall protection. As we said in the opening of this post, your harness is an integral part of your fall protection setup. But no harness will last forever, and sometimes unforeseen events can cause the harness to need to be replaced. That’s where harness inspection comes in.

    Harness inspection is a pretty simple concept – it is the act of reviewing your harness before climbing to ensure that the harness will remain functioning both while you climb and in the event of a fall. The actual act of inspecting the harness can have some mild variance depending on the construction of the harness. The main things to consider are what type of buckle system (pass through, tongue buckle, or quick connect) the harness has and whether it has a waist belt or not.

    Before you start your inspection, we highly recommend having a harness inspection form. A harness inspection form will help you keep records of when you inspected the harness as well as information like the serial number, date of first use, who inspected it, and any other notes about the inspection. We have a free downloadable harness inspection for in our Knowledge Base. Click here for your free copy of the form.

    What to Inspect


     

    Once you start the inspection, what exactly should you inspect?

    Labels & Markings

    The first thing to inspect is the labels and markings. Are all the labels intact? Do you have all the appropriate ANSI, OSHA, & CSA markings required? What is the date of first use? Has an impact indicator (sign of deployment) been triggered?

    Hardware

    Next, we want to start looking at the harness hardware. What condition are the shoulder adjustment buckles in? What about the leg and waist buckles? What about the other hardware the harness features? The D-rings should be closely inspected as well (the dorsal, side, shoulder, and/or sternal). Lastly, is any of the hardware corroded, pitting, or nicked?

    Webbing & Stitching

    The final piece of the puzzle is to inspect the webbing and stitching. What condition are the shoulder, chest, leg, and back straps in? Does the harness have any cuts, burns, or holes? Is there any paint contamination? What about excessive wear, heat corrosion, or UV damage? How is the stitching and is it affected by any of the above checks?

    Retiring a Harness


     

    The purpose of inspecting a harness is to make sure that the harness can handle the job it was meant to do. If the harness fails inspection that means it is not in compliance with ANSI requirements and should be retired and replaced immediately.

    If you’ve got questions about harness inspection, or if your harness has failed inspection and you’re looking for something new, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to download your free harness inspection form from our Knowledge Base

    Click here to access our full selection of inspection forms

    Click here to see our full selection of fall protection harnesses

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any Fall Protection Equipment is used.

    Fall Protection Harnesses: The Playlist


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  10. ANSI Standard for Descent Devices

    Few devices in your gear bag are as versatile as your descender. Whether you need to descend quickly, slowly over time, or perform a rescue, this device can do it all and keep you safe in the process. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the ANSI Standards for descent devices.

    ANSI Z359.4-2013


     

    ANSI Z359.4-2013 outlines the safety requirements for assisted-rescue and self-rescue systems, subsystems and components. I know what you’re thinking: that title doesn’t say anything about descent devices. But, in the scope of the standard, it does mention descent control devices. An important clarification for you to know is that this standard is for rescue, not work positioning. We will cover more about that later.

    Section 3.2.7: Descent Devices


     

    The ANSI Z359.4-2013 standard is further broken down by sections. Section 3.2.7 specifically covers descent devices and is broken down into additional subsections for additional clarification.

    Section 3.2.7.1

    Section 3.2.7.1 covers descent energy and capacity for both single-use and multiple use devices.

    Section 3.2.7.2

    This section looks at descent speed – setting requirements for the maximum distance that you can lower yourself. For devices like the Petzl I’D Small Self-Braking Rope Descender or WestFall Pro D4 Descender for 7/16” Rope the maximum descent speed is 6.6 feet per second.

    Section 3.2.7.3

    This section covers static strength. Static strength is defined as a singular force being put on the device. Think of this a constant rate of force – similar to holding and maintaining a load.

    Section 3.2.7.4

    Section 3.2.7.4 covers dynamic strength. Dynamic strength is defined as a peak force being put on the device. Think of this as a sudden shock of force – similar to the force that is exerted in the event of a fall.

    Section 3.2.7.5

    This final section covers the general function of the device. This is where features like anti-panic come into play. If excessive force is applied or if you let go of the device completely, the device should halt the descent within 6 inches.

    Work Positioning


     

    Earlier we mentioned that the ANSI Z359.4-2013 standard is for rescue and not work positioning. In fact, at the time of this writing, there is no ANSI Standard that covers the use of descent devices for work positioning. This doesn’t make them unsafe or mean they are not suitable for work positioning. It just means that no official standard has been released for specifications and requirements. Devices like the Petzl I’D or WestFall Pro D4 are great devices for descending down to work in suspension in a range of situations like on a tower, painting, or cleaning windows. Of course, you still need to have proper fall arrest in place like a rope grab on a backup lifeline or an SRL.

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any fall protection equipment is used.

    Not sure which descender is right for you or have questions about the ANSI Z359.4-2013 Standard? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see the Petzl I’D Small Self-Braking Rope Descender

    Click here to see the WestFall Pro D4 Descender

    Click here to see our full selection of Descenders

    ANSI Standard for Descent Devices: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts®: The Podcast


    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated
    to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® will be coming to your ears in early 2019 and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show, and sign up to get alerted when our first episode drops, head on over to gearexperts.com. There's a trailer there too, so you can get a sneak peek of the show.

    Get social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

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