January 2019

  1. Shackles 101

    When it comes to lifting and rigging, knowing the hardware you are using is an important part of safety. A common piece of hardware used in lifting and rigging is a shackle. A shackle is a metal link, typically U-shaped, closed by a bolt or screw. Shackles are typically made from forged steel to provide very high tensile strength. Many US contractors have begun requiring domestically made shackles. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down shackles.

    Domestic vs. Foreign


     

    It was mentioned above, but now it’s time to break it down further. Many US contractors have started requiring shackles that are made domestically. A domestic shackle is a shackle that has been made in the United States. They are often preferred to foreign made shackles due to better manufacturing and testing processes. Crosby, one of the most popular shackle manufacturers in the world, has a full selection of domestically manufactured shackles to meet your needs no matter what the job site requires.

    Screw Pin vs. Bolt Shackles


     

    Each job is unique and that means requirements are different. Not to mention, contractors may have preferences in addition to requiring domestic shackles. Apart from common things like U-shape size and capacity, the main difference between shackles will be whether they are a screw pin or a bolt shackle.

    Screw Pin

    A screw pin shackle is pretty self-explanatory. It is a type of shackle where the pin has a male threaded end, which tightens into the female threads in the body of the shackle. These shackles are popular because of their ease of use and are most commonly used on jobs that don’t require heavy duty attachment.

    Bolt

    A bolt shackle is pretty self-explanatory as well. It is a type of shackle where the pin has a male threaded end which is fed through the body of the shackle and secured with a bolt on the outside of the shackle. These shackles aren’t as easy to use as the screw pin shackles because of the requirements of securing the bolt to the pin. However, bolt type shackles are typically a better solution for jobs that require heavy duty attachment.

    Standards: ASME B30


     

    When it comes to lifting and rigging, which happens to include shackles – if you’re using them in a lifting and rigging capacity, the ASME B30 Standard is something that you need to be mindful of. The ASME B30 standard focuses on setting the standards for materials, rated loads, identification, inspection, repair, and removal. ASME B30 covers blocks and a range of other hardware used for lifting and rigging. We covered ASME B30 and provided a full breakdown of the standard in a previous blog post. You can find that post here.

    If you’ve got questions about shackles, standards, or domestic manufacturers, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of shackles

    Click here to see our full selection of Crosby hardware

    Click here to see our full selection of lifting and rigging equipment

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any Fall Protection Equipment is used.

    Shackles 101: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

     

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  2. Harness Inspection 101

    Whether you are in telecom, wind, solar, or tree care, construction, or any other at-height industry, the harness you wear is one of the most important pieces of equipment in your arsenal. Your harness is the apex of all your equipment. It is where everything converges, and where the perfect harmony of fall protection meets to ensure your safety on the job site. This week, our Gear Experts® are going to discuss how to properly inspect a harness.

    Harness Inspection


     

    There’s an old saying that states that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. That saying goes far beyond chains – and in the context of this blog post, it is also true for fall protection. As we said in the opening of this post, your harness is an integral part of your fall protection setup. But no harness will last forever, and sometimes unforeseen events can cause the harness to need to be replaced. That’s where harness inspection comes in.

    Harness inspection is a pretty simple concept – it is the act of reviewing your harness before climbing to ensure that the harness will remain functioning both while you climb and in the event of a fall. The actual act of inspecting the harness can have some mild variance depending on the construction of the harness. The main things to consider are what type of buckle system (pass through, tongue buckle, or quick connect) the harness has and whether it has a waist belt or not.

    Before you start your inspection, we highly recommend having a harness inspection form. A harness inspection form will help you keep records of when you inspected the harness as well as information like the serial number, date of first use, who inspected it, and any other notes about the inspection. We have a free downloadable harness inspection for in our Knowledge Base. Click here for your free copy of the form.

    What to Inspect


     

    Once you start the inspection, what exactly should you inspect?

    Labels & Markings

    The first thing to inspect is the labels and markings. Are all the labels intact? Do you have all the appropriate ANSI, OSHA, & CSA markings required? What is the date of first use? Has an impact indicator (sign of deployment) been triggered?

    Hardware

    Next, we want to start looking at the harness hardware. What condition are the shoulder adjustment buckles in? What about the leg and waist buckles? What about the other hardware the harness features? The D-rings should be closely inspected as well (the dorsal, side, shoulder, and/or sternal). Lastly, is any of the hardware corroded, pitting, or nicked?

    Webbing & Stitching

    The final piece of the puzzle is to inspect the webbing and stitching. What condition are the shoulder, chest, leg, and back straps in? Does the harness have any cuts, burns, or holes? Is there any paint contamination? What about excessive wear, heat corrosion, or UV damage? How is the stitching and is it affected by any of the above checks?

    Retiring a Harness


     

    The purpose of inspecting a harness is to make sure that the harness can handle the job it was meant to do. If the harness fails inspection that means it is not in compliance with ANSI requirements and should be retired and replaced immediately.

    If you’ve got questions about harness inspection, or if your harness has failed inspection and you’re looking for something new, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to download your free harness inspection form from our Knowledge Base

    Click here to access our full selection of inspection forms

    Click here to see our full selection of fall protection harnesses

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any Fall Protection Equipment is used.

    Fall Protection Harnesses: The Playlist


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  3. Product Spotlight: KASK Super Plasma HD Safety Helmet

    Head injuries are no joke. A head injury can cause brain damage, trauma, or even death. We know that protecting your noggin is an important part of job site safety. Not only is it important, but it’s required by law. OSHA states that a safety helmet must be worn “when working in areas where there is potential for injury to the head from falling objects”. While a safety helmet is required, not every helmet is the same. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down the KASK Super Plasma HD Safety Helmet.

    Features


     

    This helmet is jam-packed with cool features. It features ten air intakes to help keep you cool. These air intakes have an anti-intrusion grille that prevents dirt and debris from getting into the helmet. It also features premium lamp clips that are made of strong nylon and are compatible with any headlamp that has an elastic band. Storing the helmet is easy, too. The ring to hook special loop on the chin strap allows the helmet to easily connect to your harness.

    It also has visor attachments so that you can connect your favorite KASK Visor to your helmet. KASK doesn’t stop there, though. They’ve also included an integrated slot for earmuffs with a bayonet attachment. It also includes KASK’s “Up & Down System” which ensures a precise and comfortable fit around the neck. The center wheel and two side flaps allow for quick adjustment in both width and height.

    Construction


     

    The bells and whistles of this helmet weren’t only reserved for the sweet features. The construction is impressive, too. The outer shell is constructed of ABS plastic while the inner shell is made of HD Polystyrene. The soft PA Nylon provides ultimate comfort during your daily use and the universal size means this helmet can be adjusted from 20 to 24 3/8 inches (that’s 51 to 62 cm for our metric friends).

    Style & Standards


     

    This helmet has a style that more closely resembles a bike helmet rather than a traditional hard hat. But that doesn’t make it any less safe. What really matters when looking at a safety helmet is that it meets the standards (Type & Class) that are required for the work you are doing. Type covers impact and class covers electrical ratings. For more detailed information about standards, best practices, and service life, check out our Safety Helmets 101 blog post and our free Safety Helmets 101 downloadable poster.

    Now that we’ve established that there are specific standards, and you’ve had a chance to check out what those standards entail (if you didn’t already know, of course). Let’s break down the standards for this helmet. It meets ANSI Z89.1-2014 and CSA Z94.1-2015 which means the standards for this helmet have been established. Those standards are Type 1, Class C.

    If you’ve got more questions on the KASK Super Plasma HD Safety Helmet or if you’re looking for more information about safety helmets in general, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see the KASK Super Plasma HD Safety Helmet

    Click here to see our full selection of KASK gear

    Click here to see all of our blog posts about safety helmets/hard hats

    Click here to download a free copy of our Safety Helmets 101 downloadable poster straight from our Knowledge Base

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any PPE is used.

    Safety Helmets: The Playlist


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGqmxdXiNrQ&list=PLZQI6zuBv9QM4a2K-mTIvp2MefUCl5WiQ

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® is available via your podcast listening platform of choice and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up for alerts, head on over to gearexperts.com.

    iTunes | Spotify | Google Play Music

     

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  4. Gas Detection 101

    Gasses aren’t always at the top of mind when a project is being discussed or planned, but that doesn’t make them any less dangerous. When it comes to gas, the best way to be prepared is to know what you’re up against. This week our Gear Experts® are going to break down gas detection and how you can accurately keep your crew safe no matter what gas is flying around the job site.

    Gas


     

    Let’s start with the basics. We are constantly inhaling and exhaling gas – the oxygen we breathe in, the carbon dioxide we breathe out, and all the other gasses that are around us every day. Not all gas is hazardous and not all hazardous gas is toxic unless enough is breathed in. Every job is different and that means the air around the structure and the gasses created by the environment and machines are different, too. Hazardous gas can be created by a long list of different things – from natural occurrences to man-made devices.

    Knowing that a hazardous gas is present is an essential part of job site safety. Some hazardous gasses smell – which means our noses can tell us when we are exposed to them. However, not every hazardous gas can be detected by human senses – at least, not until it is too late. On top of that, mixtures of otherwise harmless gasses can cause a whole slew of dangers like suffocation, explosions, and/or fires.

    Gas Detection


     

    We’ve already mentioned that there are some gasses that we can smell easily and some gasses that we cannot smell at all. So how do we know if we are being exposed to a hazardous gas? Or how do we know if there are two gasses present that can cause other issues (like an explosion)? That can be done with a gas monitor. A gas monitor, also referred to as a gas detector, is a device that detects the presence of gas in an area.

    The actual function of a gas detector is pretty simple. The device has sensors in it that are programmed to detect the presence of specific gasses. If that type of gas is detected, the gas detector will alert the user via an alarm. The most common sensors used in at-height, industry, and construction are Combustible (LEL), Oxygen, and Toxic.

    Combustible (LEL): Combustible (LEL), or combustible lower exposure level sensors, are designed to detect and monitor combustible hydrocarbon gases in the air. The most common combustible gasses are:

    • Methane
    • Butane
    • High Hydrogen Content (HHC)
    • Nonane
    • Propane
    • Hydrogen

    Oxygen: Oxygen sensors are essential for situations where having accurate oxygen measurements could prevent injury or death. Not all areas have safe oxygen levels, especially when in confined spaces.

    Toxic: Toxic sensors are pretty self-explanatory, but they measure the levels of toxic gasses. The most common toxic gasses are:

    • Carbon Monoxide (CO)
    • Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)
    • Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)
    • Sulfur Dioxide (SO2)

    How the Sensors Work


     

    The way the sensors work varies depending on the type of sensor the manufacturer used. The most common types of sensors are:

    • Electrochemical Sensors – Most commonly used for toxic gas detection. These sensors use electrodes to send signals when gas is detected.
    • MOS (Metal Oxide Semiconductors) – Most commonly used for toxic gasses – carbon monoxide in particular. Metal oxide semiconductors use a gas sensitive film that triggers when the levels of gas become toxic.
    • Catalytic Sensors – Most modern gas monitors use catalytic sensors. Catalytic sensors have a platinum treated wire coil that heats up when exposed to gasses due to oxidation. When the resistance of the wire is changed, due to the heat generated by oxidation, a circuit detects this change and triggers the warning.
    • IR (Infrared Sensors) – This type of sensor uses a series of transmitters and receivers. The transmitters emit a light. If the receiver cannot “see” the light because of gas being in the way it triggers the warning.

    If you’ve got questions about which gas detection methods are right for your job site or if you’re looking for more information about gas detectors in general, click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of Gas Monitors

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any PPE is used.

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


     

    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® will be coming to your ears in early 2019 and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up to get alerted when our first episode drops, head on over to gearexperts.com. There's a trailer there too, so you can get a sneak peek of the show.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

  5. Thermal Gloves 101

    Just because it’s cold outside doesn’t mean the jobs stop. With low temperatures and frigid wind chills, it's more important than ever to protect yourself. Whether you are climbing towers, framing houses, or shoveling driveways your hands are two of your most important tools. This week our Gear Experts® are going to talk about thermal gloves.

    Thermal Gloves


     

    Protecting your hands in freezing temperatures isn’t always easy, but it is extremely important. Without proper protection, cold stress can start to set in and cause a whole slew of problems. That’s why we carry dozens of different styles of gloves specifically designed to handle anything winter throws at them all while keeping your hands warm and dry. Here are some of our favorite thermal gloves:

    Ergodyne 818 Pro Flex Performance Thermal Waterproof Utility Gloves


     

    The name might be a mouthful, but the Ergodyne 818 Pro Flex Gloves are no joke. They are made of dual zone 3M Thinsulate insulation for warmth and they have a waterproof/windproof breathable membrane to keep your hands dry. The weather-resistant ripstop outer shell is layered with a tena-grip palm and the fingers are touch screen compatible. The extended neoprene cuff with hook and loop closures provide added weather resistance and prevent dirt and debris from getting into the glove. This glove is available in both black and hi-vis orange.

    HexArmor Rig Lizard Arctic 2023 Gloves


     

    The HexArmor Rig Lizard Arctic Gloves feature a combination of H2X and C40 Thinsulate liners which provide excellent waterproofing and cold protection. In fact, the H2X barrier is so strong that it meets ASTM standards for resistance to blood-borne pathogens and fluid-borne viruses which means the chances of them being compromised by water is slim to none. The durability of this glove doesn’t stop there, though. The palm is made of a high strength TPX material that is rated to the highest level of abrasion resistance and oil resistant grip. This glove also features a hi-vis impact resistant exo-skeleton with IRX smash guards that provide greater impact resistance. Last, but not least, these gloves are also cut resistant meeting ANSI Level 3 (A3) cut standards.

    You can find out more about cut resistance in this previous blog post.

    PowerGrab Thermo Acrylic Gloves


     

    If you’re on a tight budget, but still need to keep your hands warm in the dead of winter, then the PowerGrab Thermo Acrylic Gloves are our go-to choice. These gloves have a seamless construction for comfort and a nearly one size fits all fit. The acrylic construction provides excellent cold weather protection and thermal insulation. The palms have a latex micro finish coating providing superior grip in wet or oily conditions. The inside is extra soft for added comfort and the knit cuff provides a barrier to prevent dirt and debris from entering the glove. Finally, this glove comes in three different colors: black, hi-vis orange, and hi-vis yellow.

    Got questions about our selection of gloves or need more information? Click here to contact one of our Gear Experts®.

    Click here to see our full selection of Thermal Gloves

    Click here to check out our blog post on cold stress

    Click here to check out our blog post on cut resistance

    **The content of this blog is not intended to replace proper, in-depth training. Manufacturer’s instructions must also be followed and reviewed before any PPE is used.

    Thermal Gloves 101: The Video


     

    Gear Up with Gear Experts: The Podcast


    We're also proud to announce Gear Up with Gear Experts® - A podcast dedicated to at-height, industry, and construction. Gear Up with Gear Experts® will be coming to your ears in early 2019 and in each episode, the hosts (Alex Giddings & John Medina) bring in a gear expert or industry leader to talk about gear, gear safety, tips, and tricks. To find out more about the show and sign up to get alerted when our first episode drops, head on over to gearexperts.com. There's a trailer there too, so you can get a sneak peek of the show.

    Get Social


     

    Be sure to follow us on social media to keep up with everything GME Supply has going on.

    Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | Twitter | LinkedIn

     

    We’re Also on Snapchat


     

    Simply snap or screenshot this image ↓ to follow GME Supply!

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